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AMY REYES – Member Spotlight – March 2017

Favorite Quote:Member of the Month Amy Reyes

“Be sure to show hospitality, in doing so one may be entertaining angels without even knowing it.”  Hebrews 13:2

Bio:

Amy Sloan Moon Reyes is native to Seattle, Washington, born in April of 1972. Her passion for cooking did not take long to come to fruition and by age 4, she was enamored by hospitality and food service. Throughout the past 40+ years, Amy has experienced a wide array of opportunity by utilizing this skill to bless her family, friends and community. Not only locally, here in the Pacific Northwest, but also in Mexico, Switzerland, Bali and Hawaii. Her passions have carried her from baking, recipe creation, designing food labels and procuring wine for a hotel opening. She has energetically provided entrees to dinner tops exceeding 60 people, appetizers and light refreshments to over 150, has enjoyed being taught creations new to her, yet custom to others and has been the teacher on the other side of the same coin. (This opportunity allowed her to teach a Korean-style cafe to sell 500 American-style hamburgers in one day!)

Throughout her life, Amy has experienced both the love and the heartache of pursuing her passion. However, changes in jobs, locations, culinary schools, marriages, raising children and injury have not derailed her from her pursuits and she continues to pour her heart and efforts into her hospitality and food giftedness. This masterful chef will not stop creating or desiring to learn just because she has her name as the Head Baker in the Genus Book of World Records for the largest cinnamon roll ever made, weighing in at 246.5 pounds. Amy enjoys the perpetual opportunity to grow as a chef and seeks challenges to better master her skills.

Favorite Recipe:

CHOCOLATE CHIP COOKIES

Ingredients:

  • 1 c. sugar
  • 1 c. packed brown sugar
  • 1 c. butter, softened
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 Tbsp. vanilla
  • 2 c. all-purpose flour
  • 1 ½ c. quick-cooking oats
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • ½ t. salt
  • 2 c. chocolate chips
  • 1 c. toffee bits

Procedure:

  1. Preheat oven to 350° F.
  2. In a large mixer bowl combine sugar, brown sugar, butter, eggs and vanilla.
  3. Beat at medium speed until light and fluffy.
  4. Sift together flour, baking soda and salt.
  5. Add oats & flour mixture to creamed mixture.
  6. Mix at medium speed until well mixed.
  7. Mix in chocolate chips and toffee bits by hand.
  8. Drop onto ungreased sheet pan using a 1 oz scoop, 2 inches apart.
  9. Bake for 13-16 min, or until desired doneness.

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STEVEN SCHRADER - Member Spotlight - November 2016

Favorite Quote:

“The art of pleasing people with the science of making money” is the hospitality business.

Bio:

In August 2013 I had the opportunity to join the Suquamish Clearwater Casino Resort Leadership team as Director of Food & Beverage. Having the opportunity to be a guest in the past, I immediately was impressed with the associates and the offerings of the beautiful property. I have always been extremely impressed with the business operations and future opportunity for success and growth.

From 2007 to 2013, I accepted an Executive Vice President position with the Lucky Eagle Casino in Rochester, Washington. Along with being part of the executive team that develops business strategies, policies and procedures, it also requires daily management leadership skill in all aspects of daily Food & Beverage operations including community involvement, marketing, finance controls and budgets, personnel management and motivation.

One step in my career with two partners was the creation of Diamondback Steakhouse / WestWorld Food and Beverage Inc. As Vice President and also Executive Chef, my experience of operating and administrative managing destination location facilities began in Scottsdale, Arizona. It was a 400 acre facility that provided indoor and outdoor events. The events would be available to all group bookings ranging from 100 to 20,000. Events such as, Barrett Jackson Car Show & Auction, live concerts (Faith Hill, Waylon Jennings, and Wynonna & Naomi Judd) special shows such as Cirque du Soleil and equestrian events & shows.

My career experience continued when I joined the Knott’s Berry Farm corporation. As a member of the management team, I managed on a daily basis multiple venues which included meeting rooms, entertainment venues, exhibit areas, food & beverage and retail stores. The daily attendance level ranged from 2,000 to 20,000.

I continued my experience in managing destination location facilities. I accepted a Director of Food and Beverage position with Legoland America to be part of the executive leadership team that planned, developed and implemented the opening of a new theme park in Carlsbad, California. The executive team was hired and in place nine months prior to opening. This project included development of all aspects of a new business from budgets, products sold, contracted services, personnel hiring and training, marketing & advertisement and community involvement in support of local hotels, visitor organizations and local businesses.

After completing the opening project Director responsibilities with LEGOLAND America, I joined Six Flags Theme Parks and worked in Northern California. As Director of Revenue with Six flags Marine World, I was responsible for direct management operations for Food & Beverage, Retail Merchandise, Games and Attractions. This position also provided management support for two water theme parks.

As many of us in the industry, my initial introduction to the hospitality industry was a means to support myself as I attended college. After a very short time in the industry I found that I truly enjoy the daily challenges of running a profitable business and influencing associates and guests to have a beautiful day. The business is truly “the art of pleasing people with the science of making money”.

Favorite Recipe:

SWEET CORN CAKE

Sweet Corn Cake is the perfect garnish between refried beans and Mexican rice (sweet and salty).

Ingredients:

  • 4 lbs Masa Harina
  • 4 lbs Butter
  • 4 lbs Yellow Corn Masa
  • 2 cups Flour
  • 4 lbs Sugar
  • 1 tbsp Salt
  • 1/2 gal Heavy Cream
  • 1 tbsp Baking Powder
  • 10 lbs Corn (whole kernel), blender or food processor, coarsely chop
  • 2 tbsp Vanilla

Procedure:

  1. Mix the masa harina and butter thoroughly.
  2. Add blended corn. Add the rest of the ingredients.
  3. Mix until masa mixture is smooth.
  4. Place smooth masa mixture in 200 hotel pan.
  5. Cover with plastic wrap.
  6. Steam for 30 minutes. The result should be firm and moist.

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LUAN NGUYEN - Member Spotlight - October 2016

luan_nguyen_msFavorite Quote:

“Don’t put off until tomorrow what you can do today.” -Benjamin Franklin

“An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” -Benjamin Franklin

Bio:

My culinary journey begin 10 years ago when I first started working as a dishwasher in a busy Vietnamese restaurant. At that time I didn’t think that one day this would be my later career choice. But I like the atmosphere of the place and the work kept me busy throughout the day. I worked as dishwasher for 3 years in a few different restaurants. The love and passion for culinary at that time was not nurtured in me yet. Not until I came back to the restaurant where I started, and worked as help cook, that is when I determined this would be my career later on. I continued to work for another 5 years in different stations but only found out that my career choice hadn’t been going anywhere. I decided to go back to school and I attended the Culinary Arts Program at South Seattle College. I graduated with an AAS degree in culinary. I still don’t have a lot of experience in western cuisine, so I decided to learn the trade in the apprenticeship program at Renton Technical College, with guidance and support from Chef Fisher of the program. I’m currently working and learning as an apprentice at Bell Harbor Int’l Conference Center under the guidance of Chef Bartleson and Chef Reisinger. I’m also working towards a BAS degree in Hospitality Management at South Seattle College.

In 5 Years I would like to finish school and get certified with the ACF as part of my 5 year goal, but the long term goal is growth and to get involved in my career as well as my community.

What ACF means to me: From the old days, people used to think that cooking is not a profession. But the ACF had changed that thought and has proven cooking is not just a profession, but it’s a profession of Arts and ACF representing our profession, where the Standard of Excellence is applied.

Favorite Recipe:

Pâté de Campagne

Ingredients:

  • 2 pounds boneless pork shoulder butt, cut into 1-inch dice
  • 4 ounces pork or chicken liver
  • 1/4 cup chopped white or yellow onion
  • 8 tablespoons coarsely chopped flat-leaf parsley
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons minced garlic
  • 1 ounce kosher salt (2 tablespoons)
  • 1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon Pate Spice (recipe follows)
  • 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 2 large eggs
  • 2 tablespoons brandy
  • 1/2 cup heavy cream
  • Optional Garnish (mix and match to taste): Diced ham, cooked mushrooms, rinsed brine-cured green peppercorns, duck confit (a total of 1 cup)

Pâté Spice Ingredients:

  • 1 teaspoon ground cloves
  • 1 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 1 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1 teaspoon ground coriander
  • 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
  • 1 tablespoon white pepper

Procedure:

  1. Freeze all your blades and bowls before gathering and measuring your ingredients.
  2. Preheat the oven to 300 degrees F.
  3. Grind the pork through the large die into the bowl of a standing mixer set in ice. Transfer about one-third of the pork to a small bowl, and add the liver, onion, parsley, garlic, salt, pepper, and pâté spice. Fit the grinder with the small die (clean the blade of any sinew that might be caught there) and grind the pork-seasonings mixture into the bowl of coarsely ground pork. Refrigerate.
  4. In a small bowl, combine the flour, eggs, brandy, and cream and stir to blend—this is the panade. Add it to the ground meat and, using the paddle attachment, mix until the panade is incorporated and the forcemeat becomes sticky, about a minute. (You can also do this using a wooden spoon or your hands.) Fold in the optional garnish, if using.
  5. Do a quenelle test to check the seasoning, and adjust if necessary.
  6. Line a 1 1/2 quart terrine mold with plastic wrap, leaving enough overhand on the two long sides to fold over the top of the terrine when it’s filled (moistening the mold first will help the plastic adhere). Fill the mold with the pâté mixture, packing it down to remove air pockets. Fold the plastic wrap over the top, and cover with the lid or with foil.
  7. Place the terrine in a high-sided roasting pan and add enough hot water (very hot tap water) to come halfway up the sides of the mold. Put the pan in the oven and bake until the interior of the pâté reaches 150 degrees F, if using pork liver, 160 degrees F. if using chicken liver, about 1 hour.
  8. Remove from the oven, remove the mold from the water bath, and set a weight of about 2 pounds on top of the terrine. Let cool to room temperature, then refrigerate until completely chilled, overnight, or for up to 1 week, before serving.

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KIKI KALENDER - Member Spotlight - August 2016

kikiFavorite Quote:

“We cannot become what we need to be by remaining what we are.” – Max De Pree

Bio:

I grew up in California working in television production. While working in LA in a Television Production Art Dept and Culinary, I met Master Chef Richard Rosendale who was a huge inspiration for me. He was the one who initially told me about The Greenbrier which led me to take the first step and join the ACF as an apprentice to get my foot in the door, and start my culinary career. In September 2014, at the age of 23, I moved to Washington to join the ACF WSCA Apprenticeship program. I am currently working as a cook for Mirabella Seattle. In Summer 2016, the WSCA board sent me and a fellow apprentice to represent the WSCA chapter at the ACF National Convention all expenses paid.

In 5 years I would like to be furthering my education by tackling The Greenbrier Culinary Apprenticeship Program.

What the ACF means to me: The ACF program is a powerhouse of knowledge and passion that is inspiring on every level. We are mentored by Chefs that genuinely want to teach and see you succeed. This is something that I am extremely thankful for.

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JENNIFER SOHONIE, CEC - Member Spotlight - February 2013

Jennifer_Sohonie_BGFavorite Quote:

“In all professions without doubt, but certainly in cooking one is a student all his life.”  -F. Point

Bio:

Jennifer Sohonie has been teaching with Le Cordon Bleu for over 5 years, starting in Dallas. Jennifer moved to Seattle in 2010 where she took on the role as Executive Chef for Le Cordon Bleu.

Prior to teaching, Jennifer spent her culinary career working mainly within fine dining. Starting in Los Angeles, she worked with restaurants along the sunset strip such as Le Dome. Jennifer then moved to Scottsdale AZ where she had the benefit of working with the Hyatt Regency’s fine dining restaurant VU, in addition to experiencing the larger volume banquets division of the hotel. Jennifer started her catering business, which she successfully moved to Dallas, TX where she was able to continue working with fine dining restaurants such as Bijoux, Bolla and Local. In Dallas, teaching started out as a secondary job, but quickly became a new passion which Jennifer took on full time.

Jennifer earned an Associates in Culinary Arts from Le Cordon Bleu in Pasadena. She also earned Bachelor’s degree from Duke University, a Masters Certificate in Hospitality from Cornell University and a Master’s in Education from the American Intercontinental University.

Favorite Recipe:

PURÉE OF CHESTNUT SOUP

Yield: Serves 6

Ingredients:

  • 4 Tbs Butter
  • ½ ea – Onion, small dice
  • 1 ea – Celery
  • 1 ea – Leek
  • 1 clove Garlic
  • ½ cup Red wine
  • 1 btl peeled, cooked chestnuts, drained (24 oz bottle)
  • 3 qt Chicken stock
  • ¼ c Crème fraîche
  • Salt and pepper
  • Garnish chervil leaves

Procedure:

  1. Heat soup pan to medium. Add butter.
  2. Add onion, celery, leek and garlic and cook until translucent.
  3. Add chestnuts and cook for 2 minutes.
  4. Add red wine and reduce by half.
  5. Add enough stock to cover the chestnuts. Cook until chestnuts are tender. Add more stock if needed.
  6. Purée the soup.
  7. Finish with crème fraîche and chervil leaves.

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MATTHEW DIMEO, CEC – Member Spotlight – October 2012

Member Since: 1998Matthew_Dimeo_BG

Favorite Quotes:

“Great spirits have always encountered violent opposition from mediocre minds.”  -Albert Einstein

“Inspiration is hard to come by, you have to take it where you find it.”  -Bob Dylan

“Wine is constant proof that God loves us”.  -Ben Franklin

Bio: 

Chef Matthew DiMeo began his culinary career working as a bread baker in the locally famous Italian restaurant DeFazio’s in his hometown of Wichita, Kan.  Catching the culinary bug, he then moved to Kansas City Missouri and completed the ACF apprenticeship program at Johnson Country Community College and spent 4 years working and learning at the Hyatt Regency Crown Center under the guidance of Tim Ryan C.E.C. Looking to broaden his experience, he moved to Seattle and honed his cooking and managerial skills at various local restaurants including Earth and Ocean, Daniel’s Broiler, and Newcastle golf club.  He landed his first executive chef position at the Iris Grill in Issaquah Washington where he managed the kitchen for 3 years.  Hearing about an open chef instructor position, he left The Iris to pursue a new path as an instructor of culinary arts at Lake Washington Institute of Technology in 2009.  He enjoys writing culinary articles for the local Kirkland Reporter, traveling, playing guitar, gardening, astronomy, chess, and hanging out with his wife Tandy and their cairn terrier Chip at their home in Renton.

In 5 years I would like:

to live abroad in Italy and lead a hot food competition team to a National ACF competition.

What the ACF means to me:

As a sometimes overly confident young cook who thought he knew it all, I couldn’t grasp the importance of the ACF in my career and in the industry.  I’ve since grown in age and experience and realized that the culinary world needs a national governing body to keep our industry’s standards at the highest possible level.  The ACF also has the important job of keeping the vast network of culinary professionals informed and united in our common goal.  Having measurable outcomes in culinary education and certification is imperative in any trade and the ACF gives us that.   It was important to accept that the ACF isn’t out to get me, but hold me to a high standard which in turn made me a stronger cook, manager, and now instructor.  Leading my team to victory at the recent Knowledge Bowl Competition in Orlando while attending my first national convention was a truly amazing experience.  To see my students succeed after so many hours of practice and study was very rewarding.  We hope to be back next year and continue to gain respect and notoriety for our school and chapter.

Favorite Recipe:

RABBIT RAGOUT

Yield: Serves 2 people

Ingredients:

  • Olive oil – 1 T
  • Butter – 1 T
  • Pancetta – 2 oz
  • Whole rabbit – 1 ea
  • AP Flour (seasoned) – 2 C
  • Mirepoix(small dice) – 1 C
  • Dried mushooms (porcini) – 4 ea
  • Garlic – 1 T
  • Butter – 1 oz
  • Flour – 1 oz
  • Tomato Paste – 2 T
  • White wine – ½ C
  • Chicken Stock (or rabbit) – 1 QT.
  • Crushed Red pepper – TT
  • Bouquet Garni – 1 ea, fresh sprig of thyme, rosemary, oregano, 4ea parsley stems
  • S&P – TT
  • Butter – 1 oz
  • Chopped Italian Parsley – 2 T
  • Orange – ½ ea

Procedure:

  1. Fabricate rabbit into 6 parts and dredge well in seasoned flour, dusting off excess flour as needed.  In a large oven ready skillet, brown rabbit well in olive oil and butter.  Remove rabbit pieces and set aside.  Discard excess fat from pan and render pancetta over medium heat until it begins to brown and crisp.  In a separate sauce pan, bring chicken stock to a simmer.  Soak dried mushrooms in hot water until softened.
  2. Add butter to the pancetta and caramelize mirepoix on medium heat.  After vegetables are well browned, (about 10-12 minutes) add garlic and sauté for another minute.   Add flour and stir to make roux.  Cook roux and vegetables until roux has achieved a blond stage, (about 6-8 minutes.)   Add tomato paste and crushed red pepper and sauté for1-2 minutes.  Deglaze with white wine.   Slowly whisk in stock and the reconstituted mushrooms with liquid.   Add bouquet garni and orange half.  Bring mixture to a slow simmer and add browned rabbit pieces back into the sauce mixture.
  3. Cover with foil and place in a 350 degree oven for 20-25 minutes or until rabbit is tender and sauce has reduced. Remove rabbit from the pan and if desired, strain the sauce into small sauce pan reduce if necessary.   Adjust seasoning with salt and pepper.  Add the fresh chopped parsley, and finish by whisking in whole butter.  Allow rabbit to cool and tear off all the meat from the carcass and add it to the sauce.  Serve by tossing ragu with fresh cooked pasta or gnocchi and top with grated parmesano reggiano.  Eat it!

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CHRIS BOWEN – Member Spotlight – June 2012

Member Since: 2011

Favorite Quote:

“If music be the food of love, play on.”

Bio: 

I graduated in Summer 2012. My interest started when I was five. I would watch my mother and grandmother cook for hours, while I asked questions. As I got older my interests became my passion. From peeling potatoes to broiling, I started in the scully to rise through the ranks to the line. I decided to make culinary arts my career. In order to achieve my goals I went back to school to become a great culinarian.

In 5 years I would like:

to be in my own restaurant.

What the ACF means to me:

A connection to the culinary world, ideas, and endless education.

Favorite Recipe:

SHRIMP & CRAB BISQUE

Ingredients:

  • Clarified butter
  • onions
  • carrot
  • celery
  • Shrimp
  • crab
  • garlic
  • tomato paste
  • fish volute
  • bay leaf
  • dried thyme
  • black pepper corns
  • parsley stems
  • heavy cream
  • salt
  • white pepper
  • cayenne pepper
  • basil

Procedure:

  1. Caramelize mirepoix, shrimp, and crab shells in butter.
  2. Add garlic and tomato paste sauté lightly.
  3. Add brandy Flambé.
  4. Add wine deglaze and reduce half.
  5. Add volute and sachet and simmer 1 hour.
  6. Strain reserve shells discard sachet.
  7. Grind bones strain threw fine chinos.
  8. Return to bisque add cream.
  9. Season salt, cayenne, white pepper and sherry.
  10. Sautee shrimp and crab add to bisque.

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JEFF PRATT – Member Spotlight – May 2012

Member Since: 2009

Favorite Quote:

“I get up every morning determined both to change the world and to have one hell of a good time. Sometimes this makes planning the day difficult.” ~E.B. White

Bio:

Jeff earned his culinary degree at Renton Vocational Technical Institute (now Renton Technical College) over 20 years ago.  His varied career has taken him from Las Vegas, working as chef and F&B director at the Legacy Golf Club, to the Kitsap peninsula as chef/innkeeper at a waterfront country inn where he was named Kitsap County Innkeeper of the Year.  Jeff has worked as chef at an upscale neighborhood restaurant in Seattle and as corporate chef for a regional retirement housing provider.

With his wife Dorée, Jeff traveled to rural South Carolina reopening a historic 1880’s railroad hotel as a country inn and restaurant.  In addition to operating the inn, restaurant & pub, Jeff served as a volunteer fire fighter in the small southern town of McCormick.

Fate has once again returned Jeff to his native Pacific Northwest where he works at Tacoma Goodwill as chef of the Neighborhood Bistro and program manager for the Culinary Skills Training Program.  Jeff splits his time between cooking and teaching while managing this hands-on entry level job training program for adults with disabilities or barriers to employment.  He also acts as working chef for the Neighborhood Bistro’s busy catering business.

As a board member for the Washington State Chefs Association, Jeff serves as chairman of the Apprenticeship Committee and is active in the re-launching of the chapter’s Culinary Apprenticeship Program.  He volunteers for the Red Cross as a Disaster Kitchen response worker.

In 5 years I would like to:

achieve ACF certification (its only taken 20 years so far…), see the chapters apprenticeship program prosper and travel to experience foods of other parts of the world.

What the ACF means to me:

The ACF allows us all the opportunity to be involved in our profession and in our community.  I enjoy the chance to help others advance in their careers and in the process increase my knowledge.

Favorite Recipe:

OEUFS EN MEURETTE

Yield: Serves 4 as an appetizer or 2 as a light entree

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup strong chicken stock
  • 1 cup pinot noir
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 sprig fresh thyme
  • 1 shallot, minced
  • 1 small carrot, peeled, small dice
  • 1 rib of celery, small dice
  • pinch black pepper
  • 1 TBSP soft butter
  • 1 TBSP Flour
  • 4 Eggs
  • 2 cups pinot noir to use as poaching liquid
  • 4 Baguette Slices, toasted
  • 3 slices thick cut bacon, ½ inch pieces, cooked crisp
  • 8oz small mushrooms, sautéed in the bacon fat

Procedure:

  1. Bring the wine, stock, herbs, and vegetables to a boil, reduce 50%, strain.
  2. Work the butter and flour into beurre manié, whisk into the sauce and return to the fire until thickened.
  3. Heat the remaining wine and use to poach the eggs to the desired doneness.
  4. Plate the eggs on top of the toasted baguette, dress with sauce and garnish with the mushrooms, bacon and a fresh herb sprig.

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RICH HILL – Member Spotlight – April 2012

Member Since: 2011

Favorite Quote:

“Reach for the sky because tomorrow may never come.” –Mike Ness

Bio:

My love for cooking started when I was very little. I remember sitting on the counter watching my mother cook the nightly dinner from scratch. I can still make some of her dishes from memory because I watched her make those so many times. I never really took up cooking while I was young, but always remembered how amazed I was at my mother’s cooking. She could take a bunch of ingredients and create something wonderful and delicious. I never understood how she did it.

After high school, I received a Bachelor’s degree in Political Science from Western Washington University and had every intention of going to law school. Instead I spent the next 12 years working in the automotive industry. In college I discovered my love of cooking. I used to cook for my friends and would love how excited they would get when I brought out the dish.

A few years ago I knew I wanted to attend culinary school. I was unhappy with my previous profession and I knew I needed a change. Once I made up my mind to go back to school, things just started to fall into place. I was laid off of my job, which was a blessing. I was able to use unemployment and the state workers retraining program to follow my dream and go to culinary school. I researched local culinary schools and chose Lake Washington Institute of Technology.

LWIT has been a great fit for me. My instructors are some of the best in the business. They have been there when I needed them, and they have stepped back at times to allow me to develop my own style of cooking. I participated in the ACF Salon Competition in 2011 and the Northwest Chowder Competition in October 2011, placing 3rd.  I am the Captain of the LWIT Knowledge Bowl Team which recently won the ACF Western Region Knowledge Bowl in Reno, Nevada. We will be traveling to Orlando in July to represent the Western Region at the ACF National Knowledge Bowl Championships. We have had tremendous support from the school and great coaching from our instructors.

I will graduate from LWIT in June and I look forward to a long and prosperous career in the foodservice industry.

In 5 years I would like to:

be running a kitchen. I want to be in a place that I can be creative and have some sort of freedom. I am a big believer of the farm to table movement that is currently sweeping through the culinary industry. I would love to be in a place that is making a point to use fresh local products. If I am not running a kitchen I would like to be in a place where I am continually learning. I am always looking to learn more about food and what is being done with it. I never want to stop learning. My immediate plans are to finish out my final quarter of school, and to prepare myself and my team to bring home the gold from the ACF Knowledge Bowl National Championships this July.

What the ACF means to me:

I am a fairly new member to the ACF but I have already started reaping benefits. The Western Regional Conference allowed me to see how involved the ACF is in all aspects of our industry. Through seminars, I learned that I really didn’t know as much about pasta as I thought I did, what spices look like in their raw forms, and how to make the perfect crab cake. To me, the ACF is a collaboration of people all wanting the same thing, to serve our customs the finest products prepared with the highest of standards. The ACF is about continuing to educate their members so that they can be the best in the industry.

Favorite Recipe:

LOBSTER BISQUE

Yield: Serves 4

Ingredients:

  • 2 live lobsters (1-2 lb. each)
  • 1 onion, coarsely chopped
  • 1 stalk celery, coarsely chopped
  • 1 carrot, coarsely chopped
  • 3 bay leaves
  • 1/2 lb. butter
  • 2 quarts water
  • 1/4 cup flour
  • 2 cups heavy cream
  • 1/2 cup sherry
  • 1/4 cup brandy
  • white pepper and salt, to taste

Procedure:

  1. Place the lobsters in a large heavy pot. Cover with salted water. Bring to a boil and cook 5 minutes. Reduce heat and simmer 10 to 12 minutes more. Drain and plunge into cold water to arrest further cooking. Extract the meat, chop it and set it aside.
  2. Place the lobsters’ remains in a roasting pan with the onion, celery, carrot, bay leaves and butter. Roast in a preheated 400°F oven for 45 minutes.
  3. Remove from the oven and strain off the butter into a heavy saucepan. Place the remaining contents of the roasting pan into the 2 quarts water and boil until the liquid is reduced by half. Strain the stock.
  4. Heat the butter in the saucepan. Add the flour and cook the roux for 4 minutes, stirring constantly. Add the stock and blend well. Then add the cream, Sherry and brandy.
  5. Simmer slowly for 30 minutes. Season with white pepper and salt to taste.
  6. Strain the bisque and add the lobster meat.
  7. Serve immediately.

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HILDE KORSMO, CWPC, CCE – Member Spotlight – March 2012

Member Since: 2009

Favorite Quote:

“A friend should be a master at guessing and keeping still: you must not want to see everything.” -Friedrich Nietzsche

Bio:

Hilde holds a Culinary Arts and Hospitality Management degree from a College of Culinary Arts in Salzburg, Austria, where she graduate at the head of her class, and obtained advanced certification as an apprenticeship instructor. Over the past 20 years Hilde has held a variety of positions in Austria, Italy and the US, ranging from restaurant and bar manager, catering director, and banquet manager. Hilde owned her own catering company specializing in European desserts before joining Bellingham Technical College as their adjunct pastry instructor in 2006. Hilde since has joined Bellingham Technical College as a tenure track instructor in pastry and culinary arts, and has completed her Certification as  Culinary Educator and Certified Working Pastry Chef with the American Culinary Federation in 2011. Hilde currently is working towards the bragging rights for the Western Regional Pastry Chef of the Year title.

In 5 years I would like to:

Create an advanced pastry program at Bellingham Technical College. I want to develop and implement an accredited pastry degree program at Bellingham Technical College.

Goal:

My goal is to lead our Knowledge bowl team to win at Western Regional Competition.

What the ACF means to me:

The opportunity to stay connected to professionals in the fields who continually strive to nurture the future chefs and food enthusiasts. It helps hold me accountable as an instructor and chef in an ever changing field. The ACF and what its stands for is a platform for supporting and developing current and future culinary students.

Favorite Recipe:

FLOURLESS POPPY SEED CAKE

Meringue Ingredients:

  • 3 egg whites
  • 20 g pineapple powdered sugar

Creaming method:

  • 70 g softened butter
  • 70 g pineapple powdered sugar
  • 3 yolks
  • Powdered vanilla sugar to taste

Equipment:

  • hand mixer
  • small bowl for mixing
  • spatula
  • scale
  • 7 “ round cake form
  • canola oil spray
  • almond flour for dusting
  • Small container
  • spoon
  • 2.5” round cutter for portion control

Pre-Procedure:

  1. Pre-heat oven to 350F or even up to 375F to speed up the process
  2. Mix Meringue first – save pot / spatula

Cake Ingredients:

  • 90 g poppy seed
  • 10 g almond meal
  • ½ shot of Stroh rum

Glaze Ingredients:

  • Lemon Mayer – powdered sugar water glaze, as needed

Procedure:

  1. Pre-heat oven
  2. Dust your cake form
  3. Cream butter, sugar, and yolks until pale yellow look
  4. Add poppy seed and almond flowers – mix briefly just to incorporate the four
  5. Add rum – mix briefly
  6. Fold in Meringue in two to three steps
  7. Pour in cake mold, spin mold to achieve even filling
  8. Bake for about 20 minutes or until set and sides start to release from pan
  9. Cool in pan just slightly (goal to serve warm cake)
  10. Cut portion with circle cutter in pan
  11. Glaze
  12. Use small off-set spatula to remove poppy seed cake for service

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TONY SUMPTER – Member Spotlight – December 2011

Favorite Quotes:

“Reach for the stars. They’re closer than you think.”

“If it were easy, it wouldn’t be fun.”

Bio:

My cooking career started in my senior year of high school. I had just finished 2 years of the National Restaurant Association program called prostart and began working in a locally owned restaurant for the summer. I then began attending West Sound Technical Skills Center during which I moved to working at quest field for a season. My second year of WST I competed in SkillsUSA and went to nationals. I also received such honors as student of the month, second year student of the year, and top sous chef.

When I was finished with high school I began working at Silverdale Beach Hotel until I moved to Renton to attend Renton Technical College. While attending RTC, I have received various certifications through the NRA management, I also competed in ACF events including junior chef of the year, 2011 salon style competition receiving a silver medal, the apprentice appetizer fund raiser taking the first place team Hot Appetizer award, and most recently 1st place in the 2011 Best of Northwest Chowder cook off.

Recently I have finished my internship at the Rainier club in Seattle and currently work at Snoqualmie Casino. I am currently training with the 2011 RTC Culinary Competition Team and am a 4 year member of the ACF, volunteering and attending meetings regularly.

Various highlights of my career include but are not limited to:

Work experience:  Doing an internship at the Rainier club

Competition:  Receiving the silver medal for category K salon

Volunteer: Attending the 2009 Governors Inaugural Ball

ACF: Receiving the ACF Presidents medallion from the National President TY 2010

Favorite Recipe:

POULET VERDE

Servings 4

Ingredients:

  • Game hen  (fabricated into frenched breasts and frenched hind quarters) 1 each
  • Tomatillos 3 each
  • Pumpkinseeds, shelled 2 T
  • Yellow onion, chopped 2Tb
  • Cilantro, chopped 1 T
  • Parsley, chopped 1 T
  • Epezote, chopped 1T
  • Chicken stock. 1.5 cups
  • Serrano pepper (optional) ½ tsp
  • Kosher salt TT
  • Fresh cracked pepper TT

Procedure:

  1. Half, season and oil tomatilos roast in the oven @ 350° F until  soft.
  2. Toast pumpkin seeds on low heat till aromatic.
  3. Place ½ stock and all ingredients except chicken in blender till smooth.
  4. Return to heat and let simmer for 5-10 minutes on low heat.
  5. During this time season and sear game hen skin side down till nice coloring.
  6. Turn over and place pan in oven at 350* F till internally 165*Fv , 15-20 minutes.
  7. Return sauce to blender and add remainder of stock and then blend till smooth.
  8. Return to pan and bring to temperature.
  9. Remove chicken deglaze pan with stock reduce.
  10. Pour over game hen and garnish with pumpkin seeds crushed.
  11. Serve with wild rice pilaf, roasted chayote squash, carrot and corn medley, and garnish with fried plantain chips.
  12. Notes: When using chayote squash remember to peel tough outer layer, roast tomatoes and pumpkin seeds on slow even heat as not to burn.
  13. (Inspired by Rick Bayless)

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MICHAEL BALDWIN CEC, AAC, CCE – Member Spotlight – November 2011

Favorite Quote:

The time and energy spent are always repaid in the end by success. -Careme

Bio:

Michael Baldwin is an American Culinary Federation Certified Culinary Educator since 1990, and National Restaurant Association Certified Serve Safe Instructor.  Michael has worked as a multiple unit chef for several concept restaurants including; Italian, Northwest Seafood, Steak house, Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner house, contemporary high end dining and hotel work.  He has also worked as the Opening Team Head Chef of approximately 20 restaurants throughout the Unites States.

Favorite Recipe:

PUMPKIN SOUP

Serving Size: 16
Preparation Time: 1:00

Ingredients:

  • 4 ounces butter
  • 2 pounds yellow onion — small dice
  • 1/2 pound leek white only — small dice
  • 3 1/2 quarts chicken stock
  • 1 quart whipping cream
  • 1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground thyme
  • 1/8 teaspoon Juniper berries (toasted and Ground)
  • tt kosher salt
  • tt white pepper
  • 1 ounce pumpkin seeds — roasted and salted
  • 3 ounces butter
  • 3 ounces flour
  • 3 pounds pumpkin meat ( 1 inch dice and roasted)
  • 16 each Rusks (seasoned with Sage)

Procedure:

  1. Roast pumpkin with salt and pepper till soft
  2. Heat butter in medium brazier sautÈ leeks & onion and spices
  3. Stir in pumpkin cook for 5 minutes, add stock cook until pumpkin is completely soft.
  4. Puree soup, season with salt & pepper
  5. Add cream cook ten minutes then puree
  6. Taste & adjust seasoning if needed
  7. Garnish with ground pumpkin seeds

Serving Ideas:

Serve in a fresh pumpkin hollowed out and warmed in the oven at 200 degree F.

Equipment:

medium brazier, whisk, heat resistant spatula, stick mixer

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DENISE FARKAS – Member Spotlight – September 2011

Favorite Quote:

“Travel is more than the seeing of sights; it is a change that goes on, deep and permanent in the ideas of living.”
-Miriam Beard

Bio:

Denise Farkas grew older but not up in Phoenix, Arizona starting her first food service job at 15. She worked with a very talented group of caterers, eventually becoming manager of their deli operations at 17. After a few more years there she went on to work as a baker and cook in various locations for four years before moving to Washington, settling in Kitsap County. Denise worked in Seattle’s old St. Cabrini Hospital and the rockin’ little Cajun Corner in the Alexis Hotel. Every day she passed by the Sorrento Hotel, eventually working up the courage to ask for employment. She was hired by Executive Chef Barbara Figueroa as a gardé manager chef. Denise credits her approach to cuisine to Barbara and the folks she worked with there. ”It really was a great place to work and in the 90’s Seattle had a culinary renaissance. I felt a bit like Alice in Wonderland and I constantly took notes and wrote down anything I did not understand, then studied my copies of the Culinary Institute of America (CIA) cookbook and Larousse Gastronomique every night on the ferry ride home. I lugged those two enormous books everywhere!”

After securing a job in the Navy club system in Kitsap County (avoiding the daily commute to Seattle), Denise worked at Subase Bangor, then Navy Station Guantanamo Bay, Cuba for a total of 10 years. Denise credits others for support and freedom to experiment. “Curtis Miller, who was the Executive Chef at Bangor, encouraged us to try new things and we looked at dishes and influences from chefs and restaurants around the country.”

She started a popular Kids Summer Cooking program at Bangor. “We taught the kids how to prepare a variety of menus such as a healthy picnic lunch that included asparagus soup which surprisingly they really enjoyed! We did an Italian meal and also cooked an Asian-influenced dinner for their parents on “Graduation Night.” The kids received certificates and swag bags (supplied by my vendors and co-workers), filled with toques, t-shirts, spices, spatulas and a thermometer so they could check temps while cooking at home. Our little chefs even learned how to handle cutting and chopping with the kitchen knives. Luckily they graduated with all digits in place but it took a few years off my life! Whew!”

Denise attended the Olympic College Culinary Arts program. She’s thankful for the continuing friendships and professional relationships she has maintained with Chef Steve Lammers and his talented crew. “Steve is always encouraging involvement with the American Culinary Federation (ACF) and, of course, the Armed Forces Day Cook Off.”

Denise served as Vice President and then President of the Olympic Peninsula ACF chapter, helping organize fundraisers and educational segments for the chapter. She has also served on the West Sound Arts Council and the Sun Newspaper Community Editorial Board.

Upon returning home from Guantanamo Bay, Cuba (GTMO) she operated her own bagel and pizza shop in Bremerton called One World Bagel & Pizza Company. “We did a lot of catering, too, and it was a labor of love for almost 6 years. We were involved in many community projects and started the Peanut Butter & Jam Lunchtime Concerts in the Park.” While working for the Navy, Denise caught the traveling bug and was fortunate to visit many exciting spots in the Caribbean and backpacking in Europe for a month. That sealed the deal and Denise knew working overseas again was going to be in her future! “At my restaurant, I hired college age folks who were traveling for a few months at a time and I was becoming pretty jealous.” She sold her restaurant the day after turning 40 and 3 weeks later was working in the Middle East, operating a dining facility, serving thousands of people a day! This time, it was more like Dorothy and she knew she was not in Kansas anymore and what a long strange trip it’s been. After 2½ years there she went from 140 degrees Fahrenheit to minus 52 all in one year, taking a winfly (Winter Fly-In) contract in Antarctica. And before you ask her, yes it was cold… interesting, beautiful and more shades of white than you can imagine.

Denise spent 3 months in Ecuador soaking up sun, culture and great recipes, then returned to the Middle East where she is still working. She spent another two years working in the dining facilities before taking a fulltime position as a ServSafe Instructor. “This has been the best job I’ve ever had! I am able to teach folks from all over the world food safety and sanitation. We are starting a food safety revolution right here! These chefs, managers and warehousemen are from India, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Philippines, the Balkans and Jordan. I am hoping they will be able to take this knowledge back home with them and get good jobs in the hospitality industry, become teachers and leaders themselves. In fact, I make it a requirement that they go back to work after our 4 day class and teach the rest of their crew. I also have plenty of Americans and some service members in my classes. I really enjoy what I am doing, I travel and teach classes 3 weeks of every month and I have had a chance to see a lot.

“I have taken some amazing R&Rs and am working on visiting every continent. I have been to many places in Europe and the food is phenomenal.  The Germans have the real deal; their bread, pastries (and beer of course) can’t be touched! Maybe the best food ever though, comes out of Morocco. The spices, lamb and local produce are amazing. If I could live in another country permanently it would probably be Morocco… it’s so exotic and the history and culture are so rich. The people are friendly, accepting and seem to have a really wicked sense of humor, they love to laugh. The djemaa el-Fna is like a Terry Gilliam circus come to town with anything and everything you can imagine. If you go to Morocco, try the camel burgers at the Café Clock, well worth getting lost in the maze that is the old Medina in Fez.”

Besides being a Registered Instructor and Proctor with ServSafe, Denise is also a Certified Professional in Food Safety (CP-FS) and HACCP Manager with the National Environmental Health Association as well as being a Certified Quality Auditor (CQA) with the American Society for Quality.

As of this writing, Denise is in Bahrain and will return to Dubai and then points west.

Favorite Recipe:

MARINATED AND GRILLED SCALLOPS WITH CILANTRO AOILI

Marinade for Scallops Ingredients:

  • Soy sauce, low sodium works best here
  • Orange juice
  • Chopped garlic
  • Fresh chopped ginger
  • Black pepper
  • Crushed red chilies

Cilantro Aioli Ingredients:

  • 1 bunch Cilantro, chopped
  • 1 Tablespoon roasted and chopped Anahiem peppers
  • 4 Garlic cloves crushed
  • Pinch of cayenne
  • 1/4 cup lime juice
  • 2 Tablespoons rice wine vinegar
  • 1 egg (use pasteurized eggs as aioli is not cooked)
  • 2 egg yolks (use pasteurized eggs as aioli is not cooked)
  • 1 cup Olive Oil
  • 3/4 cup Safflower Oil (vegetable oil or canola oil works too)
  • Salt and white pepper
  • Pomegranate seeds and additional Cilantro for garnish

Procedure:

Stir ingredients together and marinate scallops for at least 45 minutes. *To make aioli place cilantro, garlic, cayenne, peppers, lime juice and vinegar in cuisanart or blender and mix together. Add egg and yolks and continue blending until mixture lightens in color a little. With the machine running slowly drizzle in olive oil and safflower oil in a very slow stream until mixture has emulsified and is the desired consistency. Season with a little salt and white pepper. Grill scallops on Medium Heat for approximately 4 minutes on each side. Arrange scallops on plate and top each one with a little dollop of aioli or put sauce in a small ramekin on the side. Garnish with additional cilantro leaves and pomegranate seeds. Some grilled asparagus or roasted veggies would be nice with this and a side dish using quinoa or couscous would make a good accompaniment.

*Chill cuisanart bowl and attachments until ready to use.

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JEFFREY DUNCAN – Member Spotlight – August 2011

Favorite Quote:

“The only time to eat diet food is while you’re waiting for the steak to cook.” -Julia Child

Bio:

I spent a great deal of time as a kid learning to cook from my mother. As a family we sat down around a table to eat at least twice a day. My fondest memories of my childhood were the meals we shared together at the table. My first job was as a dishwasher in a local Mexican Food restaurant (Glendito’s) in Prescott Valley, AZ. I have had multiple part-time food jobs throughout my life: fast-food, pizza, barista, grocery, and beer merchandising.

In my early 20’s I went to college to become a school teacher. I have a BA degree in Elementary Education and an MA degree in Educational Administration from Arizona State University. I  have 10 years teaching experience with children and adults in both Arizona and Washington.  In 2009 I began attending Renton technical College’s Culinary Arts Program. Under the direction and inspiration of Chef John Fisher and Chef Michael McBride I made a new beginning in the world of food. While I was in school I volunteered for numerous American Culinary Federation sponsored events, RTC Events, competed in ACF Category K competitions, and I was a member of an award winning culinary team that went all the way to New Mexico for Regional competition in 2010. I was the first recipient of the Darrell Anderson Scholarship Award. I completed my culinary education with an internship at Rover’s of Seattle. I graduated with honors in August of 2010.

I currently work for No Junk Inc. as Chief of Operations. We are a Seattle based contract catering group for private schools. No Junk Inc. is a healthy from-scratch approach to student lunch. We are constantly striving to prepare healthy meals for students that are made from the freshest ingredients available. My job entails cooking, hiring, training, managing,  sales, and customer service.  We are currently expanding our business in the Seattle area.

Additionally, I am the owner and operator of It’s Personal Catering and Chef Services. My inspiration for starting this company came from my childhood and the sharing of a meal with family around a table. I believe that gathering together around good food is an essential, joyous part of life. I love creating that experience for others. I believe that the food should be delicious, alluring, ? as memorable as the occasion itself. I custom design each menu based on the customers wants and needs. I strive to create the food my customers love to eat. I want for each one of my customers to have a personalized event. I take care of the  planning shopping, cooking, serving, and cleanup allowing my customer to enjoy their guests.  I have cooked for people in their homes for private multi-course dinners, private holiday parties, office open house events, birthday parties, anniversaries, wedding receptions, and company barbeques.  I work mostly in King County, but have worked in Thurston and Clallam Counties.

This last winter I taught two evening culinary courses at Renton Technical College, Appetizers and Basic Cooking Methodologies, and I have plans to do this in the Fall. Utilizing my teaching experience and education with the love of food is a very comfortable fit for me. I am a member of the American Culinary Federation and It is my intention to work towards my ACF certifications in the very near future.

Favorite Recipe:

CHICKEN SAUTÉ WITH SHALLOT, GARLIC AND THYME

Yield: Serves 6

Method: Sautéing

Ingredients:

  • Chicken thighs (deboned) – 6
  • Salt and pepper – TT
  • Flour – enough to dredge the chicken
  • Butter – 1 fl. oz
  • Shallot (minced) – 1 oz
  • Garlic (chopped) – 4 cloves
  • Dry White Wine – 4 fl. oz
  • Chicken Stock – 4 fl. oz
  • Fresh Thyme (de-stemmed) – ½ Tbsp.

Procedure:

  1. Remove any excess fat from thighs. Leave skin on.
  2. Season the chicken with salt and pepper. Dredge the thighs in flour.
  3. Sauté the thighs in the butter and brown them. When they are cooked through remove them from the sauté pan and hold in a warm place.
  4. Add shallot and garlic to sauté’ pan and heat them both until they become slightly translucent.
  5. Deglaze the pan with wine.
  6. Add chicken stock and reduce the sauce. Add fresh thyme just before desired consistency is attained.
  7. Serve with Sauce.
  8. I enjoy this dish with sautéed asparagus and herbed risotto.

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BRUCE BONHOLZER – Member Spotlight – June 2011

Favorite Quote:

“The secret to good cooking resides in the cooks ability to say ‘the hell with the basic recipe’ and improvise freely from it. If you haven’t this kind of moxie you may as well hang up the apron.” -James Alan McPherson

Bio:

At the age of 14, I began working as a pot washer in a small independent bakery in North Seattle. while attending high school I also enrolled at the Occupational Skill Center, taking a cooking course the first year and baking course the next. after graduating from high school I decided I wanted to pursue a cooking career. I attended Seattle Community College and graduated with a Culinary Arts degree.  After working in the industry for five years and working with mostly European trained chef’s, I decided to continue my education by taking a year program at  the Cordon Bleu School, Paris, France with a degree in Classical French Cooking and Pastries. I returned to Seattle and continued working for Victor Rosellini at Rosellini’s 610, 410 and Other Place. Always having a desire to work in a ski area I moved to Colorado and took a job at the Sweet Bail in Vail, Colorado for three years. Returning to Seattle area I have been employed by for Swartz Brothers Restaurants as Executive chef at Henry’s Off Broadway, Daniel’s Broiler,Leshi and  Benjamin’s Restaurants. Owned and Managed Carreras Restaurant in Bellevue, before becoming chef for Cafe Juanita with owner, Peter Dow. Continuing my career working as Corporate chef for Bon Marche, overseeing 14 restaurants in 4 western states.  I am presently Executive Chef at McCormick Woods Golf Course, Port Orchard, Washington. Currently Advisory Board Chairman for Olympic College/West Sound Technical Culinary Arts Programs.

Favorite Recipe:

HALIBUT WITH ORANGE AND HORSERADISH CRUST

Yields: 6 portions

Ingredients:

  • 1 1/2 cups – Dry Bread crumbs
  • 6 Tbsp – Horseradish, finely grated
  • 3 Tbsp – Orange zest, finely grated
  • 4 each – Garlic clove, minced
  • 6 each – Halibut fillets, 7 oz. trimmed of skin, bones and dark membrane
  • 1 tsp – Salt
  • 1/2 tsp – Ground black pepper
  • 4 Tbsp – Canola oil
  • 3 tsp – Sesame oil

Procedure:

  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees.
  2. Combine crumbs, horseradish, orange zest  and garlic in shallow pan.
  3. Season fillets with salt, then press into crumb mixture, coating both sides completely.
  4. Heat oils in  oven proof sauté pan. Brown one side of each fillet, one to two fillets at a time for easier handling.
  5. Arrange fillets, brown side on top, in sauté pan. Place in oven until fish is firm in the middle.

Spicy Butter Sauce

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup – White wine
  • 1 Tbsp – Distilled Vinegar
  • 2 Tbsp – Shallots, minced fine
  • 1 Tbsp – Lemon Juice
  • 1/4 cup – Heavy Cream
  • 8 oz. – Butter, chilled, cut small

Add after straining:

  • 2 Tbsp – Rice vinegar, seasoned
  • 1 tsp – Sambuli Chili paste

Procedure:

  1. Bring wine, vinegar, lemon juice and shallots to boil. Reduce by half.
  2. Add heavy cream and reduce by half, remove from heat and slowly add butter, taking care not to break sauce.
  3. Strain sauce and add chili paste and rice vinegar.

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LINDA STRONG, Private Chef – Member Spotlight – March 2011


Favorite Quote:

“Living here, a Pacific Rim town, provides me with the raw ingredients to cook and enjoy all the delicious cuisines around the world.”

Bio:

Chef Linda provides custom designed events and menu’s that meet client-specific needs in Pierce, Thurston, Mason and Kitsap Counties, in Washington State. She has professionally developed and delivered menus and meals since 1999.  Cedar Bay Culinary is the realization of her passion for educating and collaborating with people who enjoy good food and cooking.

Her target market includes clients in-home, in office environments, recreational culinary schools, company gatherings, committee meetings, and shop meetings among many other venues.  Her services include cooking education, cooking demonstrations, buffets, cocktail parties, and in-home 5-Star restaurant-style meals. Her services fit clients who desire an intimate experience with memorable and customized attention, demanding excellence in development and execution, and are interested in something more than a restaurant or calling a caterer.

In ongoing collaborations as an adjunct professor with South Puget Sound Community College Chef Linda provides cooking demonstrations and tastings for the annual spring quarter class Horticulture #104.

Chef Linda is a 2002 graduate with Honors with the degree of Associate of Applied Arts from The Art Institute of Seattle (AIS) in their two-year program of study in the Culinary Arts specializing in classic French methods and techniques.  She took three years to complete the program in night classes while employed with Boeing.  After graduation, at the request of the AIS Director, she returned to teach/manage the School’s graduating classes in preparing their menus for the week’s restaurant services (for three quarters).

Following a move to Mason County, Chef Linda contracted for a year and a half; spring of 2006 through summer of 2007, with Bayview School of Cooking, a recreational cooking school in Olympia, developing menu’s and curriculums, and delivering 51 live cooking demonstrations which culminated in serving multi-course meals to students.  During her tenure, she also delivered two wine dinners with paired courses.  She left Bayview as her private chef business gained momentum.

Chef Linda’s previous 30+ year career was spent with The Boeing Company as a management consultant coaching executives in collaboration skills to achieve annual organizational goals.

Chef Linda received her MBA and her undergraduate degree in business from City University in their night programs.  She is a member in good standing of the American Culinary Federation, a nationally recognized association of Chefs across the United States.

A life-long resident of Washington State, Chef Linda lives in Shelton, Washington with her partner William Coppernoll.  Her daughter, Ann Rutherford, lives on Harstene Island in Mason County with her husband Brett.

Favorite Recipe:

POTATO GNOCCHI IN CHANTERELLE NAGE

By Chef Linda Strong

This is a comforting bowl of rich colorful broth with cheesy pillows of Italian potato Gnocchi and tender golden local Pacific NW Chanterelles; just what you need on a cold, rainy October day.  The orange gremolata is a flavor spike that complements the Gnocchi and the Chanterelles.  It’s a real standout with a glass of good Spanish Sherry.  Enjoy!!

Nage Ingredients:

  • 3 slices bacon, cut into lardons
  • 1 tbsp butter, unsalted
  • 2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
  • 4 oz onion, brunoise
  • 1 oz celery, brunoise
  • 2 oz carrot, brunoise
  • 4 oz bell pepper; colors, brunoise
  • 1 tbsp thyme, picked
  • 1 tsp rosemary
  • 32 oz chicken consommé, hand made, fully flavored

Procedure:

  1. In a 12” sauté pan, sauté the bacon lardons until golden brown and crispy; set them aside on paper towels to drain.
  2. Pour out the bacon fat and wipe out the pan; do not wash.
  3. In the hot pan, add the 1 tbsp butter and the 2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil, onion, celery, and bell pepper and sweat until tender crisp.
  4. Add the thyme, rosemary and chicken consommé and simmer for 10 minutes.

Chanterelle Mushrooms Ingredients:

  • 8 oz chanterelles, brushed off and torn into pieces
  • 1 oz butter
  • 1 oz extra virgin olive oil
  • ½ tsp salt

Procedure:

  1. In a separate preheated pan add the butter and extra virgin olive oil to melt together.
  2. Add the chanterelle pieces and sauté until tender adding salt to taste, about 5 to 8 minutes.
  3. Set aside.

Potato Gnocchi – makes about 40 pieces

Gnocchi

  • 1 lb whole russet potatoes pierced with toothpick all over
  • 2 egg yolks, beaten
  • 4.5 to 6 oz (1 to 1 ½ cups) flour
  • 2 oz Parmigiano Reggiano finely grated
  • ½ tsp salt

To Cook

  • 1 gallon water, heated to simmer
  • 2 tbsp kosher salt

To Finish

  • 2 tbsp unsalted butter
  • 2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil

Procedure:

  1. Bake potatoes at 350-deg F until tender; 35 to 45 minutes.
  2. Remove from the oven and split open to release the heat and steam; let cool until just warm.
  3. Scoop the potato from the skins and pass through a potato ricer into a bowl.
  4. Add 4.5 oz (1 cup) of the flour and the egg yolks along with the Parmigiano Reggiano and salt.
  5. Mix together with a fork or your hands, adding as little additional flour as possible until you have a workable dough; do not over mix or the resulting Gnocchi will be tough.
  6. Cut the dough ball into 4 pieces.
  7. Lightly dust work surface with flour and roll out one segment of the dough into a ¾” cylinder; about 8 to 10 inches long; cut into 1” pieces with bench knife.
  8. Flour a butter paddle and roll the pieces over the paddle to gently imprint grooves; you can also imprint grooves with a fork, but I find the butter paddle a little easier.
  9. While you wait for the water to boil, put the Gnocchi in the refrigerator. The Gnocchi can be frozen at this point for up to a month; then cook from their frozen state; it just takes a minute or two longer.  You’ll have more Gnocchi than required for this recipe.
  10. Heat a sauté pan and add 2 tbsp unsalted butter and 2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil and hold on very low heat while you cook the Gnocchi.
  11. To cook, heat 1 gallon of water in a large pot to a gentle simmer and add 2 tbsp salt; add the Gnocchi about 10 to 12 pieces at a time and poach until they float to the surface.  Don’t add too many at once, you don’t want the water to cool down.
  12. Remove them with a slotted spoon directly into the sauté pan, gently toss to coat.

Orange Gremolata 

Ingredients:

  • Zest from one large orange
  • 1 large clove garlic minced
  • 1/8th tsp salt, kosher
  • 2 tbsp peppery extra virgin olive oil

Procedure:

  1. Zest the orange into the mixing bowl to capture the oils as you zest.
  2. Mix together with the garlic, salt and olive oil; set aside. 

Assemble the dish:

  • Flat leaf parsley leaves picked and roughly chopped
  • Chives cut into confetti pieces
  • Bacon lardons
  • Orange Gremolata

Procedure:

  1. In a warm wide rimmed soup bowl place 6 Gnocchi from the sauté pan.
  2. Add 3 or 4 pieces of the torn sautéed Chanterelles.
  3. Ladle in 1 cup Nage.
  4. Top with ½ tsp Orange Gremolata, 1 tsp bacon lardons, a sprinkle of chopped parsley and chives.
  5. Serve hot.

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KARL HUTTER – Member Spotlight – February 2011

Krista Nakamura

Favorite Quote:

Engraved on a tray I received when I retired: “A man can do nothing better than to eat and drink and find satisfaction in his work; this too is from the hand of God.”
-Ecclesiastes 2:24

Bio:

Karl completed his culinary training at the Ecole Professionelle de Cuisine in Sion, Switzerland, a school that combined the classical training styles of apprenticeship and academia. The apprenticeship piece was done at the Hotel National Bellevue in Zermatt, at the base of the Matterhorn.  From there he worked in many hotels throughout Europe including the Baur au Lac in Zurich, along the Costa Brava in Spain, several locations in England, and in the Italian part of Switzerland. These multi-cultural experiences built on the classical training he had received by exposing him not only to the cuisines of many regions but also to the local ingredients found in each region. From Europe he hopped the pond to Canada, working on both coasts including Victoria and Montreal. Recruited by Western International Hotels, now Westin, Karl contined to follow the path of Executive Chef in their properties in Chicago and Seattle. Hopping another pond, he helped to open a luxury hotel in Kauai, but the mountains kept calling and so he worked as Chef at the Lodge in Vail, Colorado. As his family grew, Karl decided to make a change to academia and was a Chef Instructor at South Seattle Community College which provided the ideal venue to share his immense culinary knowledge and experience with many students.

“The highlight of all my jobs was at the Baur au Lac in Zurich, one of the top 10 hotels in the world.  The precision with which the whole operation functioned, attention to detail, teamwork led by a true master Chef and leader, exceptional sanitation, respect for equipment and tools, every dish prepared with consistency and perfection in mind, and most of all, the mutual admiration each individual had for one another irrespective of their position, gave me a vision that I tried to replicate in every other place I worked.”

“Being a chef has been far more than a profession for me, but truly a passion.”  Karl found the challenge, the creativity, the excitement and the dynamic nature of the profession very rewarding.  In addition to that, the friendships built over the years have added continuity and depth to the variety of places where he worked.  “Above all, my greatest joy is when I have prepared something special, something I have created, for good friends, and I see the joy and delight on their faces.”

Favorite Professional Resources:

Le Répertoire de la Cuisine (handbook of culinary terms and preparation methods)
Etouffer – to cook under cover and with very little moistening (now my preferred home cooking style – flavorful and low calorie)

The Epicurean by Charles Ranhofer 1894
Cut a rack of fresh pork containing 6-8 ribs. Leave it covered ¼” thick with it’s own fat and pare the chine bone. Saw it off as far as the edges of the ribs. Separate the adhering meat on top of the ribs and cut them so they are only 2½” long. Score the top into lozenges. Roll over the flap and tie up the rack w/ 8 rows of string. Lay it on the spit (or roasting pan, BBQ) and roast for about an hour, basting occasionally w/ jus clair.

Favorite Recipe:

APFEL KUCHEN CAKE

Ingredients:

  • 3 oz. unsalted butter (very soft)
  • 3/4 cup sugar (1 cup for sweeter version)
  • 1 large egg
  • 1 1/2 cups cake flour (all-purpose o.k.)
  • 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon fresh grated nutmeg nut
  • 1/2 cup light cream
  • 3 or 4 peeled and cored apples cut in wedges (can substitute plums, apricots, persimmons)
  • 3/4 cup blueberries (can substitiue currants, cranberries)
  • 4-5 oz. light colored fruit glaze (or make from apricot jam)

Procedure:

  1. Preheat oven 350 F
  2. Butter 10-inch non stick spring form cake pan
  3. In a bowl beat the butter to a fluffy consistency, fold in sugar and egg
  4. In separate bowl combine flour, salt, baking powder, nutmeg
  5. Add the dry ingredients and cream alternately to the butter mixture, do not overmix
  6. Spoon the batter into pan
  7. Add the apple wedges 1/4 inch apart on top of batter in circular rows until the dough is covered
  8. Sprinkle berries evenly over fruit
  9. Bake for 40 to 50 min. (insert skewer,must come out clean)
  10. Cool for 10 min. then remove from baking pan and move to cake tray
  11. Heat glaze and with a pastry brush coat the top of the fruit
  12. As a dessert serve with your favorite sauce

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KRISTA NAKAMURA – Member Spotlight – January 2011

Krista Nakamura

Favorite Quote:

“Like an artist painting a canvas, working in the culinary industry is incredibly rewarding and satisfying. With each and every stroke of the brush, the artist adds more to what he or she has designed, creating a masterpiece. In the same way, a chef is inspired by each and every plate to perfect a delectable dish—their masterpiece.”

Bio:

Several events pertaining to food captured Krista’s mind at an early age and inspired her to pursue the culinary field as well as the pastry field. The artistic and creative fine details fascinated and encouraged Krista to begin her journey in the food industry. Krista majored in Professional Baking at Renton Technical College during High School and graduated with honors and an increasing desire to learn more than just the art of baking and pastry work. During that time, she was also able to intern at Mike’s Amazing Cakes in Redmond, WA. Her passion grew to new depths, pushing her further to enroll in the culinary arts program.

She began the Culinary Arts program at Renton Technical College while taking outside courses to achieve her AAS degree. She volunteered at several food service events that included: Governors Inaugural Ball, RTC Graduation Dinner, RTC Competition, Special Olympics Box Lunch Build, Encore food show, etc. Throughout the Culinary program, Krista was mentored and inspired greatly by Chef John Fisher who currently is the senior instructor at Renton Technical College. He showed Krista that to be a great chef, it is not just knowing it all in your head but actually living it out and proving it through your actions, high standards and through your cooking.

Over the past year while in the culinary program, She had the privilege of observing RTC’s Junior Culinary team participate in an ACF competition. What intrigued her most was how the team members were able to use food to express themselves on a simple plate and make it more than “just cooking”. For them, food was a passion and a lifestyle, and Krista wanted to share that vision. When the opportunity came for her to compete for the Student Chef of the year competition for Washington State, she took it knowing that it was an event bigger than she had ever dreamed. Achieving the silver medal in June 2010 humbled Krista. She viewed the success as a blessing and an opportunity to go further to the 2011 Student Chef of the year regional competition. Krista realizes the rare responsibility to encourage young chefs who aspire to reach their own goals, but she also thrives on the challenge of cultivating her own culinary education.

Her philosophy on food is that the little details are the most important and most essential part of a dish. Like a story without details, food without detail is bland and unappealing.

After completing her journey in culinary arts, Krista hopes to broaden her learning by seeking out more opportunities to work in the vast field of the food industry. She thrives on stressful and
excruciating situations and desires to fulfill that by taking every opportunity she can to test stretch and expand her skills. The next few years will be filled with many challenges and many excitements for her. No matter what opportunities come her way, Krista hopes to share her love for culinary arts and hopefully inspire others to pursue their passions as well.

Favorite Recipe:

VEAL SCALOPPINI WITH MUSHROOM CREAM SAUCE

Ingredients:

  • 4 Veal scaloppini, about 2 oz. each, pounded
  • 1 Tbsp butter
  • ½ c. All purpose flour
  • 1 Clove garlic, chopped
  • 5 Cremini mushrooms, sliced
  • 1 Tbsp. Chopped onion
  • 1 c. Fresh baby spinach
  • ½ c. Marsala
  • 1/4-cup Heavy cream
  • TT Salt
  • TT Fresh ground pepper

Procedure:

  1. Add butter in a large heavy hot skillet until melted
  2. Dredge the veal scaloppini with flour (Be sure that the veal ispatted dry before dredging) and sauté the scaloppini in the butter for 1minute on each side.
  3. Remove from skillet and keep them aside in a plate.
  4. Add the garlic, cremini mushrooms and onion to hot skillet and sauté for 2 minutes
  5. Add the spinach and sauté for 1 minute.
  6. Deglaze with Marsala and add the cream.
  7. Bring to a boil and return the veal scaloppini to the skillet with the sauce.
  8. Reduce the sauce slightly and season to taste with salt and freshly ground black pepper.
  9. Serve the veal scaloppini with the mushroom and spinach sauce on top.

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HOLLI YU – Member Spotlight – December 2010

Favorite Quote:

“Culinary apprenticeship will give you a new cooking life.”

Bio:

My name is Holli Yu, I have over 25 years of  experience as a cook and food service professional. I am from Hong Kong, China, I came to the United States in 1987. I began my cook career at the age of 17 in hotel food service, I when to the Chinese culinary school for cooking and baking, than I become a Chinese professional cook and baker. I has continued my passion for cooking since. and worked at the Chinese restaurant.

Since 1997, I work at the Boeing Company for a cook, I have been selected to participate in the inaugural ARAMARK sponsored American chef’s Association Culinary Apprenticeship program from 1999 – 2002. I am very excited this program in that it provide me with an opportunity to develop skills that enhance my culinary ability, presentation and delivery of the better product and service to our customers. I bringing the theory, techniques, and trends that I am exposed to in class back to my kitchen and share my new knowledge with my peers, and helping them grow as culinary professionals.

Favorite Recipe:

HOMESTYLE MEAT LOAF WITH MUSHROOM GRAVY

Yield: Makes 12 portions

Ingredients:

  • 4 each eggs
  • 12oz milk
  • 1 cup fine dry breadcrumbs
  • 4oz onion, minced
  • 1 1/2oz minced garlic
  • ½ bunch fresh parsley, chopped
  • 2 1/2 teaspoons  salt
  • Cracked black pepper, to taste
  • 1 teaspoons ground sage
  • 3 pounds ground beef
  • 4oz tomato ketchup
  • 2oz brown sugar
  • 2 teaspoons dry mustard

Procedure:

  1. In a bow, combine the eggs and milk.
  2. Stir in the bread crumbs, onion, garlic, parsley, salt, pepper and sage.
  3. Add the ground beef mixture and mix well.
  4. Place meat mixture into loaf pans (if available ).
  5. Place in preheated 325 F oven, uncovered for 35-40 minutes or until internal temperature reaches 165 F.
  6. Combine ketchup, brown sugar and dry mustard. Mix well.
  7. Discard excess fat from loaf pan.
  8. Top meat mixture with an even coating of the ketchup mixture.
  9. Return to oven for an additional 10 minutes.
  10. Allow to set before slicing into portions. Transfer to warmer. Serve hot with mushroom gravy.

MUSHROOM GRAVY SAUCE

Ingredients:

  • 1/4 oz butter
  • 1/4 oz shallots, minced
  • 1/8 oz minced garlic
  • 1/8 pound sliced mushroom
  • 1 oz red wine
  • Salt and white pepper to taste

Procedure:

  1. In a saucepan, melt butter, add shallots and garlic. Saute until transparent, about 3-4 minutes.
  2. Add mushroom and cook over high heat until tender.
  3. Add the wine and reduce until almost dry.
  4. Add salt and pepper.
  5. Taste. Adjust seasonings if necessary. Transfer to warmer. Serve warm.

Garnish:

Chopped parsley.

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WALTER BRONOWITZ CCC, CCE, AAC – Member Spotlight – November 2010

Favorite Quote:

“The Chef who is a person of routine, lacks courage”
-Marie-Antoine Careme

Bio:

Walter began cooking professionally in his native Connecticut, which eventually lead him the Culinary Institute of America, from which he graduated in 1972. He went on to work in several regional cuisine restaurants on the Connecticut shoreline and then ran contract food service for a multi-branch company in Hartford, Ct. In 1976 he arrived in Seattle to begin working in this areas restaurants, clubs, and hotels.

Walter’s cooking style is to take the structure of the classic French and build the regional ingredients and ethnic influences of the Northwest on it, to adapt and create dishes which have a flavor profile of the diversity of the Northwest, but still make culinary sense.

He has served on the National Board of Directors for the ACF for eight consecutive years in two elected positions. The American Culinary Federation (ACF) is the national organization of professional chefs and cooks. He was the Western Regional Vice President from 2001 – 2005 and National Secretary from 2005 – 2009. He has previously served on the ACF Bylaws committee and was ACF National Certification Chair. In 1995 he was awarded an ACF PRESIDENTIAL MEDALLION by then President John Folse, Walter has since been awarded three additional ACF Presidential Medallions over the years.

Walter is also a member of the ACF/Washington State Chefs’ Association (A.C.F/W.S.C.A). The A.C.F./W.S.C.A. is the Seattle local chapter of the American Culinary Federation. At over three hundred members, the ACF/W.S.C.A. is one of the largest of the A.C.F.’s two hundred and sixty three chapters nationally. Walter has served on the Board of Directors for of the W.S.C.A. for more than twelve years, has served four terms as President and was named as the chapter’s CHEF OF THE YEAR for 1987. This award is given for dedication to the profession and the food service community. He is currently a Trustee of the Chapter.

At the 1996 ACF national convention in San Antonio, Tx., Walter was inducted to the AMERICAN ACADEMY OF CHEFS (AAC). The Academy is the honor society of the ACF and to be accepted, certified chefs must have met a lengthy set of criteria, plus be sponsored by two current members of the Academy. In October of 2000 he was presented a distinguished Service Award in recognition of his valuable contribution, distinguished service and enhancing the culinary profession by his leadership.

Walter currently is Executive Chef at Seattle Children’s Hospital. In this position he oversees a staff of eighty with the assistance of his four supervisors (sous chefs), together they operate a catering division, a staff and patient family café and patient feeding for this 250 bed facility. Walter’s direct responsibilities include recipe and menu development, nutritional oversight of all food served, sales and financial oversight, supervision and development of the cook staff, new product research, equipment purchasing and is a major contributor towards the future ten million dollar renovation of his facilities.

He has worked on the Board of the Pacific Northwest Chapter of the American Institute of Wine and Food (AIFW) as their scholarship chair and to bring national education programs to the Seattle area and as a result was a guest of honor at their May 1995 luncheon with Julia Child. Walter was one of the organizers of the Symposium on Taste and Health, held at the Salish Lodge in 1994. This conference was part of a nationwide ongoing effort sponsored by the American Institute of Wine and Food (AIWF) to raise the American conscious to understand the above issues.

Walter taught culinary education in the Seattle area for over twenty years and has earned the titles Certified Chef d’ Cuisine and Certified Culinary Educator from the A.C.F. He is also past President of the WASHINGTON STATE FOOD SERVICE EDUCATORS ASSOCIATION
(W.F.S.E.A.), a then subsection of the WASHINGTON VOCATIONAL ASSOCIATION. W.F.S.E.A. is made up of professional educators of food service for high schools, community colleges, and vocational colleges in the state of Washington. He has also contributed to several cookbooks and text books with either recipes or as a contributing editor.

His awards include three time medal winner in Professional Hot Seafood Competition at the annual Shelton Oysterfest, held each October in Shelton, WA. First Place Winner 1994 in the Bean Education Network’s, National Bean Recipe Contest  – Professional Entree Category, for his Black-eyed Peas and Chinese Greens recipe, and ACF BRONZE MEDAL from the ACF/WSCA International Culinary Salon Hot Food Competition in April of 1995.

Walter is also active in the food community serving as a judge for many various cooking competitions, including; ACF Apprenticeship graduations, Shelton Oysterfest Amateur and Professional Hot Seafood Competition, Sequim Wa. Rotary Professional Chowder Off, American Chili Society competitions, Washington State Oyster Olympics, and the Bite of Seattle.

During Walter’s time as Culinary Department Director at Edmonds Community College, he participated in the first U.S./SOVIET culinary arts student exchange. This exchange brought students and staff of Leningrad Cooking School #131 to the Edmonds campus in September of 1989. In June of 1990 the Culinary Arts staff, students and program supporters went to Leningrad(now St. Petersburg) and participated in programs at Cooking School #131.

His community service efforts are numerous. He has worked on many events in organizational capacities, food and cooking demonstrations and classes, and cooking contests. Organizations include, American Society for Healthcare Food Service Executives (ASHFSA), Slow Food, Alzheimers Foundation, March of Dimes, Chef and Child Foundation, Rotary Clubs, Pike Place Market Foundation, Taste of Washington Farms, Pacific North  West Conference on Food and Wine, Everett Public Schools, Common Meals and the American Heart Association.

Favorite Recipe

NORTH WEST OYSTER STEW

Yield: Makes 6 portions

Ingredients:

  • small non-stick sauté pans w/lids
  • .5 lbs whole butter  – room temp
  • 1.5T green chilies (Serrano, jalapeno) – minced
  • 2T garlic – minced
  • 6T   Shallot – fine chop
  • 6 oz EP leek – brunoise
  • 9 oz Poblano Chili – roasted, peeled, seeded, puree
  • 3 T coriander seed – toasted, ground
  • 5-6 each per person – shucked oysters
  • to taste – Worcestershire
  • 1 pt thin fish veloute
  • 1 Qt 1C reduced cream
  • lemon juice
  • tabasco
  • Pasta Bowls

Garnish:

  • .25c chopped parsley
  • .5 each red pepper – into curls, one day ahead

Prepartion Method, 1 Portion:

  1. to pan ADD>> whole butter
  2. place on burner, ADD>> chilies
  3. DO NOT BROWN BUTTER
  4. when butter begins to foam, ADD>> garlic, shallot, leek, Poblano puree, coriander
  5. toss together, mix well
  6. ADD>>  oysters, Worcestershire, Tabasco
  7. bring to simmer
  8. ADD>>  fish veloute
  9. return to fast simmer
  10. reduce and toss
  11. ADD>> reduced cream
  12. return to low simmer
  13. check oyster for doneness
  14. adjust seasonings
  15. pour into PASTA BOWL arrange oysters
  16. Garnish with chopped parsley and red pepper curls

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CHRIS PLEMMONS CEC, AAC – Member Spotlight – October 2010

Favorite Quote:

“Education is the key to a successful career.”

Bio:

Chris has over 20 years of experience as a chef and food service professional. He is a Certified Executive Chef and a member of the American Academy of Chefs. He keeps current in his field by participating in ongoing continuing education programs offered by the American Culinary Federation. He has participated in several local food events that support the community. They include: Kitsap County Agricultural Alliance – Chef’s Showcase of locally grown food; Festival of Trees Gala Dinner; food preparation demonstrations at local farmers’ markets (Poulsbo, Bremerton, Port Orchard, Auburn); The Bremerton Party in support of the Bremerton Foodline and Bremerton Rotary.  He headed a project of the Washington State Chefs Association that developed a Cook Book for food bank users. He was honored with a “Healthy Tomorrows” award from the Kitsap SUN and the Kitsap Credit Union for this project.

Chris is active in the Washington State Chefs Association and currently serves on the Board of Trustees. He has served on the American Culinary Federation accreditation team for collegiate culinary education programs. He is active in the Kitsap County Agricultural Alliance. He is a local food manufacturer of Two Snooty Chefs gourmet spice blends. He has provided consultation to the Kitsap Community Resources food services program and has prepared meals for the Kitsap County HIV/AIDS Foundation third Friday Red Ribbon Supper Club. Chris has served on the Board of the Bremerton Foodline and done cooking classes for food bank users in partnership with the Bremerton Foodline. He currently serves on the Sustainability Taskforce at Olympic College.

Favorite Recipes:

SALT-CRUSTED BEETS WITH HORSERADISH CREAM

Ingredients:

  • 2 C Coarse Mediterranean Sea Salt
  • 5 Tbsp prepared horse radish
  • 2 Tbsp Two Snooty Chefs Kansas City Steak spice blend
  • 3 large beets

Procedure:

  1. Pre-heat oven to 375?
  2. Combine salt, horseradish and TSC Kansas CitySteak spice blend in a large bowl
  3. Place 2 Tbsp of salt mixture in 3 mounds in a roasting pan, place a beet on each mound
  4. Cover beets with remaining salt
  5. Roast 1 ¾ hours
  6. Cool – remove salt; peel and slice the beets
  7. Serve with a dollop of horseradish cream
MOLE EGGPLANT CROSTINIS

Ingredients:

  • 2 large eggplants
  • ¾ C olive oil
  • 1 large onion
  • ½ C red wine vinegar
  • 4 Tbsp Two Snooty Chefs Oaxaca Molé spice blend
  • Kosher salt to taste

Procedure:

  1. Slice eggplant lengthwise into ½ inch slices
  2. Brush with ¼ C olive oil; either roast in oven or grill on barbeque until brown
  3. Slice onions horizontally in the same fashion as eggplant – grill on barbeque
  4. Cool eggplant and onions
  5. Dice vegetables into ½ inch cubes; place in bowl
  6. Add the rest of the ingredients; mix to combine
  7. Serve on crostinis
HUNGARIAN RAGOUT VINAIGRETTE

Ingredients:

  • ½ C white wine vinegar
  • 1 Tbsp Dijon mustard
  • 1 ½ – 2 Tbsp Two Snooty Chefs Hungarian Ragout spice blend
  • 1 ½ tsp kosher salt
  • 1 tsp sugar
  • 1 C canola oil

Procedure:

  1. In bowl or blender place vinegar, mustard, TSC Hungarian Ragout spice blend, salt and sugar
  2. Whisk or blend to combine
  3. While still whisking or blending add oil in asteady stream; serve over salad greens

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KEVIN BLAYLOCK CEC- Member Spotlight – September 2010

Favorite Quote:

“A modest garden contains, for those who know how to look and to wait, more instruction than a library.”

Bio:

Kevin began his culinary career by attending a high school Culinary Arts program at the Occupational Skills Center in SeaTac. During the two year course he was very inspired by his instructors Tony Poplin & Paul Richter and decided to make cooking his life’s passion. He received the WAVE Award Scholarship and attended the Food Science program at South Seattle Community College. Before graduating SSCC, he was offered a job as Sous Chef at a small French Bistro in Kirkland and continued to learn classic technique over the next four years.

After leaving the Bistro, he started a small catering company named Secrets of the Pacific Northwest. The concept was based on native wild mushrooms and truffles hunted in local forests. Truffles became somewhat of an obsession for Kevin, he still spends much of his free time with his dog Bear hunting for these elusive ingredients. This crazy love for fungus led to meeting the love of his life Lilli who paired the wines with a coursed truffle dinner prepared by Kevin. Lilli and Kevin married in 2008. In 2009 He teamed up with Truffle Guru Jim Wells and other Fungi Enthusiasts to propose new truffle harvesting regulations to Oregon State Representatives.

In 2006 Kevin went back to work as a Visiting Chef at the high school program where he got his start. Almost two years had passed and then Kevin received the bittersweet news that his former instructor now colleuge Paul Richter was retiring. Kevin knew that this was the ultimate job and was prepared to do anything to be considered for the position. After a lengthy interviewing process and many sleepless nights, he was hired as the Chef Instructor for the Culinary Arts Program at Puget Sound Skills Center formerly OSC. Since then, Kevin has earned both his teaching certificate through Central Washington University and Certified Executive Chef designation with the American Culinary Federation.

The Culinary Arts program at Puget Sound Skills Center has worked at many different events with the Washington Chefs Association, Renton Technical College & South Seattle Community College, including: Governors Inaugural Ball, Western Regional Conference, RTC Graduation Dinner, RTC Competition, Special Olympics Box Lunch Build, Empty Bowls, etc.

Kevin looks forward to a very long teaching career and witnessing the successes of thousands of future culinarians.

Favorite Recipe:

FORAGE PORAGE

Ingredients:

  • 2 pounds mixed wild mushrooms, such as Chanterelle, Chicken of the Woods, Porcini, Morels, Lobster, etc…
  • 1/2 cup good olive oil
  • 1 cup chopped shallots (4 large)
  • 4 tablespoons (1/2 stick) unsalted butter
  • 2 teaspoons kosher salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons chopped garlic (6 cloves)
  • 2 tablespoons chopped sage
  • 2 tablespoons chopped parsley
  • 1 cup Cognac
  • 1 cup Reduced Heavy Cream
  • 4 Cup Veal Stock
  • 1/2 cup cooked barley
  • 1 cup cooked potatoes (Small Dice)
  • Buerre Manie or Cornstarch Slurry to Thicken

Procedure:

  1. Brush the caps of each mushroom with a clean sponge. Remove and discard the stems. Slice the small mushrooms thickly and cut the large ones in a large dice.
  2. Heat the olive oil in a large (11 – inch) Dutch oven or sauce pan.
  3. Add the shallots and cook over low heat for 5 minutes, or until the shallots are translucent.
  4. Add the butter, mushrooms, salt, and pepper and cook over medium heat for 8 minutes, until they are tender and begin to release their juices, stirring often.
  5. Stir in the garlic and cook for 2 more minutes.
  6. Toss in the parsley and sage and let mushrooms brown to create a fond.
  7. Release fond with Cognac and reduce.
  8. Add potatoes, barely and veal stock and bring to a simmer for 3-4 minutes.
  9. Finish by adding reduced cream and seasoning with salt.
  10. Utilize Beurre Manie or Cornstarch Slurry to adjust consistency.
  11. This mixture is best served with toasted baguette and pairs nicely with an Oregon Pinot Noir.

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SHARLENE GREENDYK – Member Spotlight – July 2010

Favorite Quote:

“Whatever you do…do it with love.”

Bio:

The love of cooking all started at the age of 7 for Sharlene. She baked her first cake for her Aunt and Uncles 25th wedding anniversary. A chocolate cake with chocolate frosting and bright blue writing. When Sharlene presented the cake to her Aunt and Uncle and experienced the joy of their response, she knew right then that she wanted to keep bringing smiles to everyone’s faces by creating great food.

As Sharlene grew up many summers were spent at her Grandmas house where she ran and operated a day care. Sharlene would watch her Grandmother move from one pot to another stirring, shaking, adding handfuls and pinches of “Love”. As the years kept passing Sharlene would eventually ask for recipes for some of the things that she watched her Grandma make.  She remembers her saying, “Sharlene, I don’t cook with a recipe, I cook with love and no matter what you do or where you go, if you cook with love everyone around you will be happy.”

Years later, Sharlene took her first job at a Gourmet Hamburger Restaurant in Phoenix, AZ. Not incredibly exciting but a rewarding experience for a first timer into the restaurant business who was working her way up.  Shortly thereafter it was time to move on and Sharlene progressed into a PM Pantry and Banquet Prep cook position that blossomed into a Baker role that continued for 11 years in the kitchen of a business hotel in Phoenix, AZ. She later transitioned into a 3 year position as the Banquet Chef for a convention hotel in Mesa, AZ. Sharlene learned quickly how difficult and many the hours were working in the hotel business as a single mother with two small children. It was at this point in her culinary career that Sharlene found a job with Aramark Corporation in Chandler, AZ working within a business dining café environment that offered great culinary experience as well as reasonable work hours for her family priorities.

After a short few years, Sharlene was offered an opportunity that would change her and her family’s life for the better. An opportunity to move to Washington State and take a Chef Manager position with Eurest Dining Service/Compass Group at the Microsoft Campus in Redmond, WA.

Sharlene’s career was progressing quickly when one of her culinary mentors approached her with an opportunity to enter a culinary apprentice program at Seattle Central Community College to strengthen her culinary education foundation.  All of her experience to this point having been self taught; Sharlene committed to a 3 year culinary program, rotating in and out of different café operations on the Microsoft campus working with many of the great chefs that Eurest had on staff.  Her education included a number of special projects ranging from ice carvings, baking and cooking for large company events, reports and presentations back to her mentors and peers, learning how to be a culinary trainer, manager and leader of other associates.

In her 3rd and final year of the culinary program Sharlene tried out for the Washington State Hot Food Cooking Team.  She was one of the 5 on the team that competed at the Washington State Competition winning a silver medal. The team progressed to the Regional competition in Tucson, AZ where they again placed a silver medal and qualified for Nationals in Las Vegas, NV and taking 3rd by a fraction of a point.  The experience in a lot of ways was far greater than anything that she had accomplished to this point in her culinary career and reflects fondly upon.

Sharlene is currently a Chef Manager at one of Eurest’s Center of Excellence/Training accounts in Renton, WA; she also holds a position as District Chef supporting 9 other Eurest accounts within the Seattle area in culinary, marketing and purchasing.  Sharlene always communicates to the associates and Chefs that cooking is about the love. The love you have for what you do and what you feel and that it will come through in the food you prepare and present.

Sharlene is currently the Apprentice Chairperson for the Washington State ACF and a committee member on the JATC that sponsors the culinary program for the state of WA. Sharlene’s kids are now grown and preparing to jump into their own lives and she reminds them that when you find something that you love, you make sure you give it your all and you will be happy.

Favorite Recipe:

KOREAN BBQ BABY BACK RIBS

Sauce Ingredients:

  • 1 cup Soy Sauce
  • 16oz Thai Chili Sauce
  • 2 tea Sirachi Sauce
  • 1/2 tea Minced Fresh Garlic

Procedure:

  1. Combine all sauce ingredients in a medium Sauce Pan.
  2. Bring to a low simmer until sauce thickens (coats the back of a spoon).
  3. Set aside.

Ribs Ingredients:

  • Kosher Salt & Fresh Ground Pepper Blend
  • Chinese Five Spice
  • Baby Back Pork Ribs

Procedure:

  1. Rub the ribs with Chinese Five Spice back and front.
  2. Sprinkle with the Salt & Pepper blend.
  3. Lay out on cooking sheet and roast in a 300 degree oven for 2 hours.
  4. Remove from oven and  brush with the Korean BBQ sauce.
  5. You can grill the ribs or Roast them in the oven.
  6. Cook to an internal temp of 145 degrees.
  7. Cut into 1 or two rib portions and enjoy.

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ROB NATHE – Member Spotlight – June 2010

Favorite Quotes:

“The wonderful thing about the game of life is that winning and losing are only temporary unless you quit.”

“Trials are but lessons that you failed to learn presented once
again, so where you made a faulty choice before, you can now make a better one and thus escape all pain that what you chose before has brought to you. In every difficulty all distress and each perplexity, Christ calls to you and gently says, “My brother, choose again.”” -A Course in Miracles

Bio:

As a child I was eager to help in the kitchen.  I made too much of a mess for moms liking, but I always got to help grandma.  Grandma can I help, I would inquire.  She would reply, “Peel those potatoes.” As I got older she let me help more. In what seemed no time at all I was making sauces and gravies in addition to peeling those potatoes.  In High School we had a campus restaurant where we fed faculity and staff. There we had several rotations (dining room, kitchen, management, and menu planning). I excelled in the restaurant and even won both the student of the year and customers choice awards my senior year. Since high school I have explored other careers outside of the food industry only to be called back. My true passion is cooking. I have been at Sysco for 11 years,  5 of which I have held my current position of company Chef. The most enjoyable parts of my current position are creating new, exciting, and innovative dishes as well as assisting our customers overcome obstacles in their day to day operations.

Favorite Recipe:

RED ONION AND ROSEMARY MARMALADE

Yield: 1 quart

Ingredients:

  • ¼cup olive oil
  • 2lbs red onions shaved thin
  • 1tsp. rosemary, fresh, chopped fin
  • 1cup red wine
  • 1cup water
  • 1tsp beef base
  • 2cups heavy cream
  • Seasonsalt to taste

Procedure:

  1. In hot sauté pan add the olive oil and red onion.
  2. Continue to sauté at medium heat until onions are soft. Stir frequently.
  3. Add red wine and rosemary, reduce until almost dry.
  4. Deglaze with beef stock and reduce until almost dry.
  5. Add heavy cream and reduce by half.
  6. Remove from heat and season to taste.

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DAN LEWARK CEC, AAC, CCE – Member Spotlight – May 2010

Executive Chef Sand Point Country Club

Favorite Quote:

“Circumstances don’t make a man, they reveal him.”

Bio:

Dan Lewark began his culinary career at a very young age. He bussed tables and washed dishes at a local hotel. He found himself staying after his shift to work for free with the cooks and the passion was born. As a senior in high school he enrolled in Darrel Andersons Culinary program at the Occupational Skills Center. Darrel’s enthusiasm was infectious providing more and more opportunities to learn. At the same time Dan had earned a chance to work as a full time dinner pantry cook at the Holiday Inn and moved up the ladder from there. Darrel Anderson asked him to come to the Washington State Chef’s meeting and apply as a junior member. During that meeting mentor Chef’s like Carl Hutter, Evelyn Enslow, Mel Fortson and Michel Deville inspired and encouraged the incredible passion that was building inside him.

After working at “Michel’s” Michel sent him to train at Maxims Restaurant Francaise in Chicago. From there the path led to Sheraton Hotels, Red lion Hotels at three locations, was featured on 6 episodes of AM and PM Northwest a local television show as well as their opening of the La Posada in Scottsdale Arizona, Beverly Plaza Hotel, L’Ermitage Restaurant Francaise in Beverly Hills California and Chez Michael Restaurant Francaise in San Francisco where he had the opportunity to cook for guests like Chef’s Roger Verge, Jacques Pepin and Hubert Keller. Julius Castle and The Shadows Restaurant Francaise in San Francisco were also part of the journey. Dan traveled around the country learning and practicing his craft at some of the country’s finest establishments receiving dozens of glowing newspaper and magazine reviews.

In the late 80’s Dan was asked to head up the kitchen at Landau’s, a new Bellevue restaurant. After years of working away from home it was time to take his young family back to Seattle. His menu was a blend of Asian, French and Italian flavors and received rave reviews for years. Dan was hired as Executive Chef at Sand Point Country Club in 1994. Since then, he has continued to impress the members and their guests with his extraordinary cuisine.

Throughout his career, Dan has been committed to the education and training of himself and the people that work with him. He has been an ACF mentor to many aspiring chefs and an Approved Certification Evaluator (ACE) and current Competition Chair.

Favorite Recipe:

After a long week at work I love a good braise on my days off. It’s easy and it is especially good the next day.

CHICKEN BASQUAISE

Yield: Serves Four

Ingredients:

  • 1 ea 3 ½ lb chicken, cut into 8 pieces
  • Kosher salt and fresh ground black pepper
  • 1 cup sherry wine or a fruity white wine
  • 8 ea garlic cloves, thin sliced
  • 1 ea sprig fresh thyme
  • 2 t red pepper powder
  • 1 t crushed red pepper flakes
  • 1 ea lemon, zest and juice
  • 1 ½ oz olive oil
  • 2 ea chorizo sausage
  • 1 ea onion, cut into large dice
  • 2 ea red bell peppers cut into large dice
  • 2 ea tomatoes cut into large dice
  • 1 cup chicken stock

Procedure:

  1. The night before your day off – Combine wine, garlic, thyme, red pepper powder,red pepper flakes, lemon juice and zest.
  2. Remove the chicken from the marinade reserving the marinade.
  3. Let drain and pat dry with paper towels.
  4. Heat olive oil in your braising pan and sear to a beautiful golden brown. Set aside.
  5. In the same pan sear the chicken pieces on both sides also to a golden brown and set aside.
  6. Add the onions and peppers and sauté until soft.
  7. Add the reserved marinade and over high heat and reduce the liquid by half.
  8. Add the chicken, chorizo, tomatoes and chicken stock.
  9. Bring to a simmer, cover with parchment and lid.
  10. Place into a 325 degree oven for approximately 1 hour.
  11. Put some brown rice in the rice cooker and now you can go out and mow the lawn and wash the car. Me, I am going to ride my Harley. When you come back in the house will smell great!!!!
  12. Grab a good loaf of French bread and a small salad and your there.

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JANET WATERS, CWPC – Member Spotlight – April 2010

Favorite Quote:

“We are the music makers, and we are the dreamers of dreams.” – Willy Wonka

Bio:

Janet Waters, CWPC, has been a bakery instructor at Lake Washington Technical College (LWTC) in Kirkland, Wash., for seven years. At the school, she instructs students and oversees production of catering events and the retail bakery’s operations. She received her Associate’s Degree in culinary arts in 2000. She went on to earn a Bachelor’s Degree in culinary management from The International Culinary School at The Art Institute of Pittsburgh in 2009. She is a proctor for the NRAEF, Servsafe, and the King County Health department food handler card program. Janet Waters has received numerous awards, including LWTC’s Instructional Excellence Award in 2008, ACF Washington State Chefs Association’s Chef of the Year in 2007 and three silver medals at ACF competitions in 2005 and 2006. She has been an active member of ACF Washington State Chefs Association for over 5 years.

Recently, she competed as a semi finalist, at the Western Regional conference, for the Pastry Chef of the Year Award. Chef Waters is also involved with the Washington State Sugar Artists and serves as Secretary for the Washington State Chefs Association.

Favorite Recipe:

Here is an interesting ‘gluten free’ and ‘dairy free’ recipe:

CHOCOLATE BROWNIE COOKIES

Ingredients:

  • 1 # 14 oz Powdered sugar
  • 6 oz cocoa powder
  • ¼ oz salt
  • ½ oz vanilla
  • 1# 8 oz Chopped pecans or walnuts
  • 9 oz egg whites

Procedure:

  1. Mix the dry ingredients in a mixing bowl.
  2. Add egg whites and vanilla and mix well.
  3. Stir in nuts.
  4. Scoop onto parchment or silpat – push down (it will be a bit sticky).
  5. Bake 375* for 15 min or until done.
  6. Enjoy!

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STEFANIE BRANICA, C.C.C. – Member Spotlight – February 2010

Favorite Quote:

“Anything worth doing is worth doing well.”

Bio:

Seattle Native, Food Safety Educator, Caterer and Chef

Working her way up through ranks of Seattle Public School’s Child Nutrition program to Head Cook and looking for extra income, Chef Branica started her own off-premises catering business. With some invaluable help and advice from Chef Darrell Anderson CCE, CEC, AAC, she became an enthusiastic small business owner and opened Stefanie’s Catering.  It was during this time she had the privilege of serving as the editor of the local WSCA newsletter and as Secretary of the Washington State Chef’s Association. Her hard work and dedication to the profession brought her the WSCA’s 1998 Chef of the Year Award.

Following 5 years of school lunchroom management, catering experience and coupled with her knowledge of child nutrition Chef Branica landed the Executive Chef and Dietary Manager Position at Seattle’s Children’s Hospital. Responsibilities included the feeding of hospital patients, the feeding of visitors and staff in the hospital cafeteria and developing a robust in-house catering department. With a staff of 75 employees, working in the healthcare field proved challenging and rewarding and she put Stefanie’s catering n hold.

Chef Branica’s work at Children’s led to a newfound expertise in food safety and sanitation.  She so enjoyed training her staff, she left Children’s to pursue education as a full time career. As Education Specialist for King County Public Health, Chef Branica teaches the Food Worker Card Training classes. Together with her King County Education team, Chef Branica annually distributes over 50,000 Food Worker cards in the King County area.

Last year Chef Branica was the WSCA Chapter chairperson of the Western Regional Chef’s Conference in Seattle and was awarded a trophy from past president of the Western Region, Chef Harry Brockwell.

Missing the thrill of the kitchen and catering business, Chef Branica dreams of re-opening Stefanie’s Catering. But with any culinary career, anything is possible in the next phase of her culinary adventure.

Favorite Recipe:

Here is one of Chef Branica’s favorite dessert recipes from Stefanie’s Catering…

POACHED PEARS IN WINE SAUCE

-By February 2010 Member Spotlight – Stefanie Branica

Yield: Serves Four

Ingredients:

  • 4 each – Bartlet or Bosc Pears (Hard or unripe is okay)
  • 1 cup – Sugar
  • 1 cup – Red Wine
  • 4 tbsp. – Lavender Honey
  • 4 tbsp. – Parmesan Cheese Curls

Procedure:

  1. Preheat over to 375F. Wash and dry the pears. Cut the bottoms from the pears so that they stand up in a roasting pan or pyrex dish.
  2. Place pears in pan and pour the sugar around the pears. Pour the wine over the sugar and bake the pears for 45-60 mins or until soft.
  3. Remove the pears from the oven to let cool slightly and reduce the juice in the pan by half or until it is a syrupy consistency.
  4. After cooled, place each pear on a dessert plate while the juice is reducing, drizzle a tbsp. of honey on each plate with the pear.
  5. Drizzle the reduced sauce over each pear and sprinkle with parmesan cheese curls.
  6. ENJOY!

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TAMAS RONYAI, Executive Chef, Pastry Chef, Sommelier – Member Spotlight – January 2010

Favorite Quote:

“Tell me what you eat, I’ll tell you who you are.”

Bio:

Tamas Ronyai has brought extensive international experience to Seattle. Starting in Budapest, Hungary he completed his international chef’s papers and apprenticed at the famous Hotel Gellert. Working with foreign embassies he became exposed to cuisines of all nations. The urge to travel was answered by the Hilton Hotel chain that sent him to Rome, London, Bangkok, Jakarta, Bali, Singapore and Kuala Lumpur. This experience has created a truly international flair. The next stop on his travels was supposed to be one year working at The Fairmont Chateau Laurier in Ottawa, Canada. Canada captured his heart with its variety and cultural diversity. While in Ottawa he managed to open Ottawa’s first hotel kosher kitchen to great reviews and worked for the Governor General (Queen Elizabeths representative) at Rideau Hall catering to Head’s of State from around the world. He also met wife, Fiona, while working at the Chateau Laurier and they married in Scotland in 1991.

Toronto was developing a creative dining scene so that was the next stop on his culinary journey. The Studio Café at The Four Seasons hotel was a great introduction to the city and he was soon lured away to open Twiggy Café – a trendy restaurant on Queen Street West across from CITY TV’s studios. Many entertainment stars became regulars.  The private club sector was competing with the many great restaurants that were opening in the downtown core. The Ontario Club recognized this and convinced Tamas to join them to “kick their menu into the 21st Century”. The members loved it and supported his competitive nature by helping to send him to GAST EXPO ’98 in Luxembourg with Team Ontario where they gained international recognition and a Gold medal. He also competed in the Master Chef competition for Team Canada where they achieved a silver medal. He completed his sommelier certificate and became involved with the local wine scene providing members with great winemakers dinners.

In 1999 The Vancouver Club enticed him across the country to the west coast where he became expanded culinary offerings with great pastry delights for Vancouver’s social and business elite. During this time the trained in chocolate and pastry at the Valhrona Chocolate Academy and Laduree Pastry Shop in France. Tamas called Canada home for more than 18 years and was always active in the local chefs associations. He was first Vice President of The BC Chefs Association where he initiated Vancouver’s first Chocolate competition “Salon du Chocolat”. It is now a key event on the Vancouver culinary calendar.

In 2007 a new challenge presented itself and Tamas made the move to Seattle to takeover the kitchens at Safeco Field. It was a new experience and he enjoyed the challenge of providing high quality and healthy food options to the fans of The Seattle Mariners at Safeco Field in the Diamond Club, the All Star Suite and other corporate  suites focusing as much as possible on local products.

Teaching the new generation of culinarians is something he takes seriously. He has taught and developed courses at Paul Bocuse Institute in Lyon, France, George Brown College in Toronto and The Arts Institute in Vancouver. He trained several apprentices at Safeco Field in Seattle. He also believes in giving back to the community.  He worked with the Salvation Army to establish a culinary program for the disadvantaged. He has been a guest chef at Farestart and contributed to the Bainbridge Island Library fundraiser.

After 3 seasons at Safeco and much soul searching he realized that the previous jobs that he enjoyed the most was working at private clubs.  That has led him to Wing Point Golf and Country Club. He is a true people person with a vast knowledge of the industry and an ability to motivate people to do their best job. Tamas, his wife Fiona, daughter Julia (14) and son Nicholas (16) have lived on Bainbridge Island for 3 years and look forward to many more years to come. Tamas looks forward to developing Wing Point into a dining destination on Bainbridge Island.

Favorite Recipe:

CHICKEN TAGINE AND BEET MANGO SALAD SLIDER

Safeco Field at TASTE Washington- The chefs of Safeco Field participated at TASTE Washington at Qwest Field to promote the culinary aspects of the ballpark experience. We served 4500 portions to an eager audience.  Here is the recipe for you to enjoy.

Yield: 8 Servings

Beet Mango Salad Ingredients:

  • 3 raw Beets – washed, peeled and coarsely grated
  • 1 Mango – peeled and cube
  • 1 Garlic Clove
  • 10-12 Mint Leaves
  • 1Tbs chopped cilantro
  • 1/2 t Salt
  • 2 T Lime Juice
  • 2T Plain Yogurt
  • Juice of 2 oranges
  • 1 T Extra Virgin Olive Oil

Procedure:

  1. Place beets and mangos in a bowl and sprinkle with icing sugar.
  2. Pound garlic, mint and salt in a mortar and pestle until smooth – gradually add lime juice, yogurt, orange juice and oil.
  3. Pour half sauce over beets and mangos and toss.  Add more as needed.

Chicken Tagine Ingredients:

  • 1 small chicken cut into pieces
  • 1 1/4 c Water
  • 1 Slice Lemon
  • Pinch of Saffron Threads
  • 4 Crushed Garlic Cloves
  • Pinch of Salt
  • 1 t Extra Virgin Olive Oil
  • 1/2 t Ground ginger
  • 1/2 t Paprika
  • 1/4 t Ground Cumin
  • 7 oz. Pitted green Olives, rinsed
  • 2 T Lemon Juice

Procedure:

  1. Pan sear the chicken in a medium pan in the oil, add lemon, saffron, garlic, salt,5Tbs water and half of the ginger.
  2. Reduce heat and cover. Cover and bake it in the oven for 40 minutes.
  3. Add remaining ginger, paprika and cumin and stir gently.
  4. Remove chicken, cut in small pieces and take out bones.  Return it to the sauce (there should be approx 3/4 cup).
  5. Add olives and lemon juice and simmer for 5 minutes.
  6. Let cool.
  7. Place some salad on slider bun and top with chicken. MMMM…

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JOHN FISHER, CEC – Member Spotlight – December 2009

Favorite Quote:

“I would rather work in the kitchen with a smart idiot than a stupid genius.”

Bio:

Chef John Fisher, C.E.C., C.C.E., A.A.C., has been employed as Senior Chef Instructor at Renton Technical College (RTC) in the Culinary Arts program, beginning April 28 2003. Chef Fisher graduated from Renton High School in 1966 and is a 1967 graduate of the Renton Technical College Culinary Arts program.

Chef Fisher was the Academic Director of the Culinary Arts program at the Art Institute of Seattle for eight years as well as a culinary instructor. In March 2003, he received the ACF (American Culinary Federation) Chef Professionalism award for the Western Region. In 2002, Chef Fisher won the Western Regional American Academy  of Chefs Chairs Award and was profiled in the November 2002 issue of the National Culinary Review, Chef Fisher was elected Western Regional c/o Vice Chair in 2003 and  2009 ,currently serves as National AAC education chair. Chef Fisher has contributed numerous articles to the American Culinary Federation’s National Culinary Review and to other culinary publications including Chef Magazine and Chef Educators Today and was involved in filming 100 episodes of 90-second culinary tips for the serious cook on Northwest Cable News. He led the Art Institute of Seattle’s Hot Foods Team to first place in the ACF Western Regional Junior Hot Foods Competition.

Chef Fisher has 45 years of experience in the hospitality industry. He has taught at Boise State University and has been the executive chef in numerous hotels, clubs, and restaurants. Some of his honors include Chef of the Year (1974-1979) and has won 40 Gold, 41 Silver, and 18 Bronze medals  as well as two Grand Salons, in the American Culinary Federation competitions. Chef Fisher has been a member of the American Culinary Federation for 39 years and the American Academy of Chefs for 26 years and was appointed the Education director on the AAC Board for 2008. Chef   Fisher won the 2005 Western Regional Hermann G. Rusch Achievment Award for leadership and dedication to the culinary industry. Chef Fisher was elected Vice Conseiller Culinaire Provincial Pacific North West Region for the Chaine des Rotisseurs and was awarded the Bronze Star of Excellence, Chef Fisher Has been reasently appointed the Conseiller Culinaire Provincial PNW and elected consellier culinaire Provincial for half the United States. Chef Fisher was Inducted into the  Honorable Order of the Golden Toque a life time achievement for contributions to the culinary industry, there are only 100 members world wide,  Chef Fisher resides in Renton Washington with his wife Kathryn Fisher of 27 years.

Favorite Recipe:

WASHINGTON ALDER GRILLED CHICKEN

Ingredients:

  • ½ cup of Fruity white wine
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 2 tbsp lemon juice
  • 2 tbsp minced shallots
  • 1 tsp crushed Marjoram
  • 1 tsp chopped parsley
  • ½ tsp crushed tyme
  • 2 cloves minced garlic
  • Salt and Pepper to taste
  • 4 Washington grown chicken breasts (Draper Farms)
  • Raspberry glaze
  • 8 sage leaves
  • 1 cup of vegetable oil

Procedure:

  1. Combine all ingredients except chicken, sage leaves and vegetable oil; mix well.
  2. Marinate chicken in the mixture for 8 hours or overnight in the refrigerator.
  3. Add moistened alder chips to hot coals.
  4. Grill chicken skin side down, approximately 8 to 10 minutes; turn and cook until chicken tests done at 165 degrees and juices run clear when cut with a knife.
  5. Fry sage leaves till crisp 350 degrees, pat dry and hold on absorbent towel.
  6. Serve with Raspberry glaze, garnish with fresh raspberries and crispy fried sage leaves.
  7. Raspberry Glaze: Combine ¼ cup of fresh or frozen Raspberries in a sauce pan with ¼ cup of dry port wine, 1/4 cup of sugar and 1 1/2 tsp corn starch slurried with port wine. Cook and stir over medium low heat until sauce thickens and comes to a boil. Stir in 2 tbsp of white balsamic vinegar; strain and pour over chicken.

Recipe Nutritional Info:

412 calories, 31 grams of protein, 20 grams of fat (5 saturated fat), 18 Grams Carbohydrates, 93 mg. cholesterol / 94 mg sodium

Raspberry glaze:
79 calories /o grams. Protein/ 0grams  fat/16grams carbohydrates. 0mg cholesterol/1mg sodium 

Wine suggestion: Merlot / Summer time dry Rose”

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TONY PARKER CEC, AAC, CCE – Member Spotlight – November 2009

Favorite Quote:

“I have always said and truly believe that anything is possible, let your imagination be your guide.”

Bio:

Tony Parker; Executive Chef, General Manager, Master Ice Sculptor, Husband and Father and beginner mountain climber.

Tony started his career at the young age of 15 working as a bus boy. Within 3 years, Tony worked his way up in the kitchen and developed a passion for cooking on a combat line in a busy café. During this time, he was working and putting himself through college to become and Engineer. Later, knowing he wanted to pursue cooking, Tony quit college and attended South Seattle Community Colleges culinary program, where he graduated a year and a half later.

Tony worked at the Westin Hotel as an apprentice.  It was here that he developed an interest for ice carving.  Later he moved to Rainier Golf and Country Club to continue his apprenticeship with Chef Joseph Sir.  Working under Chef Joseph Sir, he trained in all the areas of the kitchen including pastry, sauté, and butchery.

Dreaming of owning his own business, Tony left the Country club and purchased his own Inn in Aberdeen. This Inn included a café, a fine dining restaurant, banquet facilities for 500, a lounge with live music and a 66-unit motel. During this time, Tony hosted a radio show called “Ask the Chef.”

Leaving Aberdeen to return to the Seattle area, Tony has since worked in a variety of restaurants perfecting his culinary skill in French, Chinese and Greek Cuisines. While working as a Chef, Tony has continued to master the art of cooking at restaurants, hotels, golf clubs and even an Air Force base.

During his tour at Mc Cord Air Force Base, he helped to co-locate the Officers and NCO clubs together. Tony increased the profits at four bars, two restaurants, and a banquet facility. He developed new menus and helped train the staff.

Continuing on his journey, Tony opened and developed (from the ground up), The Holiday Inn Hotel and Suites in Federal Way. Tony was the Chef and the food and beverage director at the hotel. He designed all of the back of the house areas, purchased all small wares and equipment for the restaurant, lounge and convention center. He oversaw all of the construction in the food and beverage areas. All of the menus for the restaurant lounge and banquet areas were created by Tony. He hired and trained all of the staff for the front and the back of the house.

He has also worked for Six Flags as a Food and Beverage Manager and most recently he has been with Eurest Dining Services with the Boeing facilities.  Tony has worked in the Renton facility as the Executive Chef, the Auburn Campus as the Food and Beverage Director and is currently the General Manager at the Kent Boeing Space Center.

During all of his training and working, Tony has continued to carve ice and has become a master ice sculptor creating ice creations for many different companies, sports teams, private weddings and receptions, and most recently for the Governor’s Ball. During Ice Carving Competitions, Tony has won gold and silver medals and has been the captain of many ice sculpting teams.

Tony is a member of the Washington State Chef’s Association and serves on the Board of Directors.  He is the past Fundraising Chair Person and was the Certification Chairperson for 5 years.

Just recently, he achieved part of his dream of climbing to the summit of Mt. Rainier. On July 4, 2009, Tony hiked to Glacier Basin; the first step on his way to the top.

Tony Parker, Executive Chef,  General Manager, Expert Ice Sculptor, Husband, Father and Mountain climber.

Favorite Recipe:

NORTHWEST SMOKED SALMON QUESADILLA

Yield: Approximately 6 servings

Ingredients:

  • 10 oz. Kippered Salmon (chopped)
  • 6 oz. Lox
  • 1 Lemon (juiced)
  • 1 pkg. Rondele cheese (Garlic Herb)
  • 1 bunch Green onions (chopped)
  • 2 oz. (shredded) pepper jack cheese
  • To taste Cayenne pepper
  • Spreadable Consitency Sour Cream

Procedure:

  1. Spread mixture onto half of a flour tortilla. Fold over to cover spread.  Lightly brown in a sauté pan both sides and finish in a hot oven until mixture is heated throughout.
  2. Cut quesadilla into equal wedges and arrange on a plate.
  3. Garnish with a pesto sour cream mixture that you thinned out to a consistency conducive to decorating with a squeeze bottle.
  4. Top with finely chopped green onions and Tomatoes.

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MARK LINDEN CEC AAC – Member Spotlight – October 2009

Member Since: 1984

Favorite Quote:

“In what so ever you do, do it with all your might, soul and heart.”

Bio:

I remember a day in the fall of 1975 when a buddy of mine in middle school challenged me to take a cooking class specifically for guys. It was titled Food Chefs 1. I took him up on the bet because the only other option was drafting and I had already taken that. So the condition was that he had to come with me. The rest is history; he went into the Coast Guard and I into the kitchens. I have been blessed with a great occupation and career these past 32 years that has been a lot of fun along the way. Along with that has come some great kitchen experiences with chef’s who were passionate about what they did and were eager to pass it along. I truly believe that the first chef you have sets the tone for what is to come in your decision to follow his/her footsteps.  So I to have tried to follow that example, along the way I have had to tell a few that maybe being in the kitchen was not the right thing for them, rather find out now, make a few changes and enjoy life. As we all know it can get quite brutal and intense in the places we work.

My true passion is:

If I had to pick an item I would probably say that working on the line in the thick of the rush is truly exhilarating to me. The chance to take on the beast we call the rush, stay out of the weeds and come out at the end of the night with no returns, a happy crew and pleased guests, toast it off with a cold beer and try again the next day. Why, because it makes you think on your feet, calls on all of your cooking reserves and temperament to pull it off. Plus gives you the chance to show your cooks that you still have it in you and that you can do what it is that you are asking of them, to cook consistently, follow the basics, and make sure that it follows the specifications that were developed.

In 5 years I would like to:

Retire. Enough said… Seriously I would like to have developed a model culinary program that feeds the elderly, giving them a measure of dignity in the last years of their life. God has blessed me with a talent, that my parents allowed me to sow. I have been an executive chef in fine hotels, owned my own catering company that required often times doing events hundreds of miles from my kitchen, developed safety measures for a remote site catering company as well as consulted to many other food service operations on how to better their operations. Cooked on boats, trains, planes and in the middle of nowhere and turned a FedEx hanger into a dining room for 1500 people, only to find there were no lights for the kitchen areas.   Of all these experiences none has been as gratifying as my current position as Director of Dining Services for Exeter House. Now comes the time to put back into the community what I have been so blessed with.

What the ACF means to me:

I have been involved with the ACF for nearly 25 years. I have been fortunate to have held all the offices, attended many conferences’, as well as develop the certification program for the state of Alaska. Getting six chefs certified to be able to proctor the test in Alaska. I believe that the ACF offers the best opportunities for young and old culinarians to better their craft. It is not a competition amongst those in the organization but a competition inside your self to truly be the best you can be. Being certified is a worthy pursuit and in time it will pay the dividends that it was designed for. I look forward to being an active member to the WSCA and am here to assist anyone who needs some help along the way.

Having been inducted into the American Academy of Chefs has been a highlight along the way and again reinforces our main job as a chef and that is to pass along the right principles and integrity of our profession.

Favorite Recipe:

SCRAMBLED EGGS WITH CHANTERELLES AND TOMATOES

Ingredients:

  • 8 oz Fresh Cleaned Chanterelles
  • 4 oz Diced heirloom tomatoes
  • 1 oz fresh basil, chiffonade
  • 6 ea Eggs
  • 3 T Butter
  • Dash Salt and fresh cracked pepper
  • 2 T minced chives
  • 2 T Cream
  • 1 oz Smoked Mozzarella cheese
  • Wine: A nice Sauvignon Blanc

Directions:

  1. Pick Mushrooms with a good friend
  2. Clean and pat dry
  3. Add half of butter to pan, add mushrooms and tomatoes, sauté, season
  4. Remove
  5. Add remaining butter, scramble eggs and cook lightly, fold in remaining ingredients and mushroom mix.
  6. Serve over lightly toasted whole grain bread
  7. Enjoy with the Wine and fellowship

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JOSH SCHIESSL – Member Spotlight – September 2009

Bio:

I began working as a dishwasher in Stanwood, Washington when I was
fifteen years old. My cousin, who was in desperate need of a line cook, apparently saw some potential in me.  I was sixteen years old when I began working as a line cook at an airport in Arlington; at this time, I had never thought much of becoming a chef. Cooking had always made me feel good and I thoroughly enjoyed the people aspect of it. I was majoring in math at Washington State University when I was introduced to chef named Bill Cambell. He worked at a restaurant called the Combray and he asked what I was doing with my life. That question, and speaking with him, changed my life forever. I enrolled at his alma mater, Baltimore International Culinary College. I graduated from B.I.C. with an Associates of Arts degree in Professional Cooking and Baking. I then went on to cook at the historic Hotel Belvedere as a sous chef and also cooked at the most popular restaurant in Baltimore, Spike and Charlies. As I was still young, living life and learning new things were a priority so I became a cook at a dude ranch in Arizona and later cooked at a fly fishing resort in Colorado. I returned home with many great stories and a new spice for life. I began working at the Everett Golf and Country Club as the Food and Beverage Manager, and from there, renewed my passion for cooking by taking the position of Sous Chef at Blackfish Restaurant at the Tulalip Resort Casino.

My True Passion:

Local Markets and Teaching:
I love showing new people the tricks of the trade. I love teaching the jargon of the kitchen as well as the discipline that is cuisine a la minute.  I love the fact that as chefs we never stop learning, there is so much that we can learn as a team. The diversity of the people I have worked with has not only enriched me as a chef but also as a person.  Learning of the cultures as using our local ingredients and manipulating them to become their own is just amazing and it renews my love of cuisine everyday.

In 5 years I would like to be:

still working at the Tulalip Resort Casino. I would like to continue to learn more aspects of the kitchen operations here and continue my education with more classes on how to do the basic skills that the chefs are looking for here at the Tulalip Resort Casino. Tulalip Resort Casino puts a tremendous focus on education, especially at the supervisory roles; they want to put you in a position to succeed. I would like to continue this through our staff so that we can continue to develop our team members here.

What ACF means to me:

ACF means a diverse culture to see what other chefs are doing in the industry.  It is a fraternity of compassion as well as creating a culture to be a top professional in an industry I have put my heart and soul into.  It is networking and creating young professionals in the culinary world while showing them to never give up. It is teaching and learning from people who have done it so many times and that they can show you the tricks to be successful no matter where you are.  ACF has given me the confidence to become a better chef and to strive for more not only for myself, but for my team around me.

Favorite Recipe:

This is one of our signature items here at Blackfish and is my favorite item here at the restaurant.

CRAB CAKES WITH ROASTED CORN AND MAPLE BACON

Ingredients:

  • Fresh Corn, roasted cut from cob – 1/2 cup
  • Dungeness Crab meat lightly pressed not squeezed – 12 oz
  • Red crab meat, lightly pressed not squeezed – 12 oz
  • Shallots, minced –  4 Tbsp
  • Fresh chives, minced – 2 Tbsp
  • Parsley, chopped – 1 Tbsp
  • Fresh Tarragon, chopped – 1.5 Tbsp
  • Red Bell pepper, bruniose – 3 Tbsp
  • Yellow bell pepper, bruniose – 3 Tbsp
  • Dijon – 4 Tsp
  • Panko – 6 Tbsp
  • Cooked Maple bacon 1/4″ cut – 6 Tbsp
  • Mayo – 2/3 Cup
  • Kosher Salt – pinch
  • Cayenne – pinch
  • Eggs lightly beaten – 2 Each

Procedure:

  1. Lightly oil corn on the cob, season, and grill.
  2. Cut kernels from cob and chill.
  3. Combine with corn,  fold together.
  4. Gently fold into crab mixture.
  5. Using a number 50 rind mold form into tall disc ( 2.5 oz each), Lightly press into panko on both sides.
  6. Saute in clarified butter until golden brown, gently flip and saute other side.
  7. Finish in oven to internal temp of 145

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NANCY BEAUCHAMP – Member Spotlight – June 2009

Member Since: 2004

Bio:

I have always loved to feed people, even when I was young. I had 2 wonderful mentors, my grandmother who was a wonderful cook and made THE best hot rolls you ever ate, and my Dad who had been a cook in WWII in the European theatre and made the best oatmeal cookies and cowboy coffee. Both of them taught me there’s always someone who needs help, and in our family you helped people by feeding them. A meal became an emotional experience, either by what we ate and why, or by feeding others and the emotional experience that created. This bond was why I became a chef.

Every time I make bread I think of my grandmother. Every time I snap beans or shuck an ear of corn, I remember when I was a little girl and doing that after picking bushels in the fields to can, so we would have food for the winter. Every time I donate food to the food pantry, I think of my Dad and the countless bags of groceries we delivered over the years to folks who needed them. Cooking, and teaching others our skills passes those things on and creates experiences as well. That’s why we do what we do, and that’s why I am who I am. Because of those who came before and taught us what we know.

My true passion is:

Pastry
There are many directions to go as a chef, but pastry has always been IT for me. Even when I was in high school, I must haved owned around 100 cookbooks and tried almost every dessert recipe in every one. I didn’t have anyone to teach me then, but I tried them over and over until I got them right. I still do that at home in my own kitchen.

In 5 years I would like to be:

A Culinary Arts Instructor
I have been working with Gary Fuller and the students at WSSC occasionally and really enjoy volunteering with the students. There are so many students out there who are amazing! I feel as chefs, we have the responsibility to train them up and inspire them to try as hard as they can. So many of them have extraordinary talents, and we should encourage their passion and creativity. If I can help encourage them and help them in anyway, it just passes the legacy on of those who took an interest in me and encouraged me.

What ACF means to me:

The ACF has been a part of my life for about 5 years now. My chef mentor, Chef Mike Dean in Yellowstone, encouraged me to join our chapter there when I worked as the Director of Employee Dining Rooms in Yellowstone. We were a small, but very active chapter. Mike taught me about being a professional chef and following the Culinarian Code. He taught me about the ACF and how not only the organization can help you, but how you can help the organization as well. It has been an avenue of achievement and direction for me. Becoming a pastry chef had always been a dream for me, and through both the encouragement of ACF members and education through the ACF, it is a reality. The ACF means an organization of people in this industry who have knowledge and credibility, and the ability to become something better…..someone better. I want to thank the people in our ACF chapter who have encouraged me to learn more, stretch myself and become more, and achieve a dream.

Favorite Recipe:

WHITE CHOCOLATE TIRAMISU W/ POMEGRANATE INFUSION

We presented this for the first time at Mammoth Hot Springs dining room in Yellowstone as a Valentine’s dessert special. It’s easier than it sounds and the presentation is beautiful. Enjoy!

Ingredients:

  • 6 0z. Mascarpone cheese
  • 2/3 cup whipping cream
  • 1/2 cup granulated sugar
  • 2 1/2 cups pomegranate juice
  • 24 lady fingers

White Chocolate Zabaglione, recipe follows:

Ingredients:

  • 2 Tbsp. whipping cream
  • 1/4 cup white chocolate (chips, discs, block)
  • 4 large egg yolks
  • 1/3 cup granulated sugar
  • 1/4 cup Grand Marnier (you may omit this if you wish)

Procedure:

  1. Add cream and white chocolate to a heavy, small saucepan. Cook and stir until chocolate discs are melted and smooth. Set aside and keep warm.
  2. Whisk the egg yolks, sugar, and Grand Marnier in a bowl until blended. Set the bowl over a saucepan of simmering water, but do not allow the bottom of the pan to touch the water. (A Double Boiler may also be used). Whisk the egg mixture over the simmering water until it is thick and creamy, about 4 minutes. Remove from the heat. Using a rubber spatula, fold the melted white chocolate mixture into the egg mixture. Cover and refrigerate to chill completely. This mixture will have the consistency of pastry cream.
  3. Place the mascarpone cheese in a large bowl and set aside. With a mixer, whip the cream and ¼ cup of sugar in a bowl until soft peaks form. Fold the whipped cream into the mascarpone. Then fold in the chilled White Chocolate Zabaglione. Cover and refrigerate.
  4. Warm the pomegranate juice over a low heat. Whisk the warmed pomegranate juice and the remaining ¼ cup sugar in a saucepan until it forms a simple syrup. Remove from heat and cool.
  5. Line a 9 1/4 x 5 x 2 3/4 Loaf pan with plastic wrap, allowing the plastic to extend over the sides. Working with one lady finger at a time, dip the cookies into the simple syrup and arrange in a single layer side by side over the bottom of the prepared pan. Spoon 1/3 of the Zabaglione mixture over the cookies to cover. Repeat dipping the cookies in the syrup and layer the cookies and remaining Zabaglione mixture two more times. Dip the remaining cookies in the syrup and arrange side by side on top of the tiramisu. Press lightly to compact slightly. Cover the tiramisu with plastic and refrigerate at least 6 hours.
  6. Unwrap the plastic from atop the tiramisu. Invert the tiramisu onto a platter. Remove the plastic wrap. Slice and plate. Garnish with white chocolate curls and pomegranate syrup.

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